166 And Before All That The Battle Of Hastings Anglo Saxon And Norman England Book PDF, EPUB Download & Read Online Free

The Norman Conquest
Author: Marc Morris
Publisher: Open Road Media
ISBN: 1453298967
Pages: 464
Year: 2013-07-02
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The riveting and authoritative bestsellinghistory hailed by the Times (London) as “a much-needed, modern account of the Normans in England.” The Norman Conquest was the most significant military—and cultural—episode in English history. An invasion on a scale not seen since the days of the Romans, it was capped by one of the bloodiest and most decisive battles ever fought. Language, law, architecture, and even attitudes toward life itself —from the destruction of the ancient ruling class to the sudden introduction of castles and the massive rebuilding of every major church—were altered forever by the coming of the Normans. But why was this revolution so total? Reassessing original evidence, acclaimed historian and broadcaster Marc Morris goes beyond the familiar story of William the Conqueror, an upstart French duke who defeated the most powerful kingdom in Christendom. Morris explains why England was so vulnerable to attack; why the Normans possessed the military cutting edge though they were perceived as less sophisticated in some respects; and why William’s hopes of a united Anglo-Norman realm unraveled, dashed by English rebellions, Viking invasions, and the insatiable demands of his fellow conquerors. Named one of the best books of the year by the Kansas City Star, who called the work “stunning in its action and drama,” and the Providence Journal, who hailed it “meticulous and absorbing,” this USA Today and Wall Street Journal bestseller is a tale of gripping drama, epic clashes, and seismic social change.
The Idea of Anglo-Saxon England 1066-1901
Author: John D. Niles
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1118943325
Pages: 448
Year: 2015-09-28
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The Idea of Anglo Saxon England, 1066-1901 presents the first systematic review of the ways in which Anglo-Saxon studies have evolved from their beginnings to the twentieth century Tells the story of how the idea of Anglo-Saxon England evolved from the Anglo-Saxons themselves to the Victorians, serving as a myth of origins for the English people, their language, and some of their most cherished institutions Combines original research with established scholarship to reveal how current conceptions of English identity might be very different if it were not for the discovery – and invention – of the Anglo-Saxon past Reveals how documents dating from the Anglo-Saxon era have greatly influenced modern attitudes toward nationhood, race, religious practice, and constitutional liberties Includes more than fifty images of manuscripts, early printed books, paintings, sculptures, and major historians of the era
Domesday England
Author: H. C. Darby
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521310261
Pages: 432
Year: 1986-08-07
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Domesday Book is the most famous English public record, and it is probably the most remarkable statistical document in the history of Europe. It calls itself merely a descriptio and it acquired its name in the following century because its authority seemed comparable to that of the Book by which one day all will be judged (Revelation 20:12). It is not surprising that so many scholars have felt its fascination, and have discussed again and again what it says about economic, social and legal matters. But it also tells us much about the countryside of the eleventh century, and the present volume is the seventh of a series concerned with this geographical information. As the final volume, it seeks to sum up the main features of the Domesday geography of England as a whole, and to reconstruct, as far as the materials allow, the scene which King William's clerks saw as they made their great inquest.
1066
Author: G.K. Holloway
Publisher: Troubador Publishing Ltd
ISBN: 178306997X
Pages: 250
Year: 2013-03-08
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England is in crisis. King Edward has no heir and promises never to produce one. There are no obvious successors available to replace him, but quite a few claimants are eager to take the crown. While power struggles break out between the various factions at court, enemies abroad plot to make England their own. There are raids across the borders with Wales and Scotland. Harold Godwinson, Earl of Wessex, is seen by many as the one man who can bring stability to the kingdom. He has powerful friends and two women who love him, but he has enemies will stop at nothing to gain power. As 1066 begins, England heads for an uncertain future. It seems even the heavens are against Harold. Intelligent and courageous, can Harold forge his own destiny – or does he have to bow to what fates impose?
The Normans and Their Adversaries at War
Author: Richard P Abels, Richard Philip Abels, Bernard S. Bachrach
Publisher: Boydell & Brewer
ISBN: 0851158471
Pages: 232
Year: 2001
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Studies of warfare, armies, logistics and weapons throughout the Norman realms.
Writing the Welsh borderlands in Anglo-Saxon England
Author: Lindy Brady
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 1526115743
Pages:
Year: 2017-07-22
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This is the first study of the Anglo-Welsh border region in the period before the Norman arrival in England, from the fifth to the twelfth centuries. Its conclusions significantly alter our current picture of Anglo/Welsh relations before the Norman Conquest by overturning the longstanding critical belief that relations between these two peoples during this period were predominately contentious. Writing the Welsh borderlands in Anglo-Saxon England demonstrates that the region which would later become the March of Wales was not a military frontier in Anglo-Saxon England, but a distinctively mixed Anglo-Welsh cultural zone which was depicted as a singular place in contemporary Welsh and Anglo-Saxon texts. This study reveals that the region of the Welsh borderlands was much more culturally coherent, and the impact of the Norman Conquest on it much greater, than has been previously realised.
1066 and All that
Author: Walter Carruthers Sellar, Robert Julian Yeatman
Publisher: Methuen Pub Limited
ISBN: 0413775275
Pages: 167
Year: 2005
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75th Anniversary edition of a top-selling humour classic The first date in English History is 55 B.C., in which year Julius Caesar (the memorable Roman Emperor) landed, like all other successful invaders of these islands, at Thanet. This was in the Olden Days, when the Romans were top nation on account of their classical education, etc. Since its publication in October 1935 1066 and All That has itself becomes part of our humour history. The authors made the claim that 'All the history you can remember is in the book' - and, for most of us, they were probably right. But it is their own unique interpretation of events that has made the book a classic; an uproarious satire upon textbook history and our confused recollections of it. 4 million copies sold worldwide since original publication, and continues to sell strongly 75th Anniversary gift-book edition. The perfect humour title for Christmas Brand new illustrations by Steven Appleby (Bloomsbury's The Secret Thoughts of Dogs/ Cats/ Babies)
Danes, Saxons, and Normans
Author: John George Edgar
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages: 249
Year: 1863
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A Needle in the Right Hand of God
Author: R. Howard Bloch
Publisher: Random House Incorporated
ISBN:
Pages: 230
Year: 2006
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The story of the creation and history of the Bayeux Tapestry describes the famed textile's panoramic record of the incidents and circumstances leading up to the Battle of Hastings in 1066, as well as its eventful existence since its creation.
Shieldwall
Author: Justin Hill
Publisher: Abacus
ISBN: 0748120009
Pages: 400
Year: 2011-05-26
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A Sunday Times Book of the Year 'Justin Hill's Shieldwall . . . superbly evoked the wordplay of the period's poetry as it unfolds a compelling story of Earl Godwin's battles against the Norse' The year is 1016 and England burns while the Viking armies blockade the great city of London. King Ethelred lies dying and the England he knew dies with him; the warring kingdoms of Mercia, Wessex and Northymbria tremble on the brink of great change. One man lives to bear witness to the upheaval: Godwin, barely out of boyhood and destined to become one of his country's great warriors. When Ethelred's son Edmund takes the throne, determined to succeed where his father failed, he plucks Godwin from domestic peace to be right-hand man in his loyal shield wall. Godwin must traverse the meadows, wintry forests and fogbound marshes of Saxon England, raising armies of monks, ploughmen and shepherds against the Viking invader. With epic courage and ferocity, Godwin and Edmund repel the butchering Danes in three great battles. But an old enemy, the treacherous Earl Eadric, dogs Godwin's footsteps, and as the final battle approaches, around the valiant English the trap begins to close.
A Brief History of Britain 1066 - 1485
Author: Nicholas Vincent
Publisher: Robinson
ISBN: 1849012148
Pages: 160
Year: 2011-06-23
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From the Battle of Hastings to the Battle of Bosworth Field, Nicholas Vincent tells the story of how Britain was born. When William, Duke of Normandy, killed King Harold and seized the throne of England, England's language, culture, politics and law were transformed. Over the next four hundred years, under royal dynasties that looked principally to France for inspiration and ideas, an English identity was born, based in part upon struggle for control over the other parts of the British Isles (Scotland, Wales and Ireland), in part upon rivalry with the kings of France. From these struggles emerged English law and an English Parliament, the English language, English humour and England's first overseas empires. In this thrilling and accessible account, Nicholas Vincent not only tells the story of the rise and fall of dynasties, but investigates the lives and obsessions of a host of lesser men and women, from archbishops to peasants, and from soldiers to scholars, upon whose enterprise the social and intellectual foundations of Englishness now rest. This the first book in the four volume Brief History of Britain which brings together some of the leading historians to tell our nation's story from the Norman Conquest of 1066 to the present-day. Combining the latest research with accessible and entertaining story telling, it is the ideal introduction for students and general readers.
The Early and Middle Ages of England
Author: Charles Henry Pearson
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages: 472
Year: 1861
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The History of English
Author: Ishtla Singh,
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134644566
Pages: 240
Year: 2013-09-05
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The History of English provides an accessible introduction to the changes that English has undergone from its Indo-European beginnings to the present day. The text looks at the major periods in the history of English, and provides for each a socio-historical context, an overview of the relevant major linguistic changes, and also focuses on an area of current research interest, either in sociolinguistics or in literary studies. Exercises and activities that allow the reader to get 'hands-on' with different stages of the language, as well as with the concepts of language change, are also included. By explaining language change with close reference to literary and other textual examples and emphasising the integral link between a language and its society, this text is especially useful for students of literature as well as linguistics.
An Historical View of the English Government, from the Settlement of the Saxons in Britain to the Revolution in 1688
Author: Mark Phillips, Dale R. Smith
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages: 889
Year: 2006
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An Historical View of the English Government consists of three parts, concerned with the most substantive revolutions in English government and manners: from the Saxon settlement to the Norman Conquest, from the Norman Conquest to the accession of James I, and from James I to the Glorious Revolution. Millar maintains that the manners of a commercial nation, while particularly suited to personal and political liberty, are not such as to secure liberty forever.