A People Betrayed The Role Of The West In Rwandas Genocide.php Book PDF, EPUB Download & Read Online Free

A People Betrayed
Author: Linda Melvern
Publisher: Zed Books
ISBN: 185649831X
Pages: 272
Year: 2000
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Melvern reveals how the great powers failed to heed the warnings of the coming catastrophe, and refused to recognise it when, in 1994, up to one million people were killed in Rwanda in a deliberate, public and political campaign.
Conspiracy to Murder
Author: Linda Melvern
Publisher: Verso
ISBN: 1844675424
Pages: 380
Year: 2006
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Conspiracy to Murder is a gripping account of the Rwandan genocide, one of the most appalling events of the twentieth century. Linda Melvern's damning indictment of almost all the key figures and institutions involved amounts to a catalogue of failures that only serves to sharpen the horror of a tragedy that could have been avoided.
The Rwanda Crisis
Author: Gérard Prunier
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 023110409X
Pages: 389
Year: 1995
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In the spring of 1994 the tiny African nation of Rwanda exploded onto the international media stage, as internal strife reached genocidal proportions. But the horror that unfolded before our eyes had been building steadily for years before it captured the attention of the world. In The Rwanda Crisis, journalist and Africa scholar Gérard Prunier provides a historical perspective that Western readers need to understand how and why the brutal massacres of 800,000 Rwandese came to pass. Prunier shows how the events in Rwanda were part of a deadly logic, a plan that served central political and economic interests, rather than a result of ancient tribal hatreds -- a notion often invoked by the media to dramatize the fighting. The Rwanda Crisis makes great strides in dispelling the racist cultural myths surrounding the people of Rwanda, views propogated by European colonialists in the nineteenth century and carved into "history" by Western influence. Prunier demonstrates how the struggle for cultural dominance and subjugation among the Hutu and Tutsi -- the central players in the recent massacres -- was exploited by racially obsessed Europeans. He shows how Western colonialists helped to construct a Tutsi identity as a superior racial type because of their distinctly "non-Negro" features in order to facilitate greater control over the Rwandese. Expertly leading readers on a journey through the troubled history of the country and its surroundings, Prunier moves from the pre-colonial Kingdom of Rwanda, though German and Belgian colonial regimes, to the 1973 coup. The book chronicles the developing refugee crisis in Rwanda and neighboring Uganda in the 1970s and 1980s and offers the most comprehensive account available of the manipulations of popular sentiment that led to the genocide and the events that have followed. In the aftermath of this devastating tragedy, The Rwanda Crisis is the first clear-eyed analysis available to American readers. From the massacres to the subsequent cholera epidemic and emerging refugee crisis, Prunier details the horrifying events of recent years and considers propsects for the future of Rwanda.
Rwandan Genocide: The Essential Reference Guide
Author: Alexis Herr Ph.D.
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 1440855617
Pages: 319
Year: 2018-04-30
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This important reference work offers students an accessible overview of the Rwandan Genocide, with more than 100 detailed articles by leading scholars on an array of topics and themes and 20 key primary source documents. • Elucidates the many factors, from economic motivations to international malaise, that contributed to the Rwandan Genocide • Profiles male and female perpetrators who led, participated in, and planned the genocide • Highlights the stories of Rwandan and foreign heroes who risked and, in some cases, lost their lives to save others • Sketches the many complexities that help explain why the United Nations and the international community at large failed to stop the atrocities
Women and War in Rwanda
Author: Georgina Holmes
Publisher: I.B.Tauris
ISBN: 0857723170
Pages: 344
Year: 2013-10-25
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The 1994 genocide in Rwanda, which followed the death of President Habyarimana, was one of the worst humanitarian disasters of the twentieth century. Beamed into the living rooms of the West, it shamed both African and global leaderships. As wars in the Congo continue to tear apart the region, this book examines how the politics that led to the 1994 genocide continue to be played out in the international media. Drawing on a range of African and international primary sources, Georgina Holmes argues that the media represents a site within which political and military actors can influence narratives about war and genocide, and breaks new ground in analyzing the role of gender in the conflict. This book is essential reading on the gendered dynamics of conflict and genocide in Rwanda and the Democratic Republic of Congo and will appeal to anyone with an interest in Gender Studies, Media and Film Studies, African Studies and International Relations.
Social Entrepreneurship in the Age of Atrocities
Author: Zachary Daniel Kaufman
Publisher: Edward Elgar Publishing
ISBN: 1781002142
Pages: 259
Year: 2012-01-01
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ïHow can anyone make a difference in a world marked by genocide, civil war, refugee crises, disease epidemics? With conscience, hope, and sweat equity, Dr. Zachary Kaufman and the other contributors to this book have offered aid, created organizations serving victims of human rights violations, and learned from set-backs and failures. Their insight into challenges of sustainable fund-raising, organizational design and management, and skepticism about young Western volunteers can inspire and instruct others who hope to address suffering and injustice through initiative, analysis, and commitment.Í _ Martha Minow, Dean of the Faculty of Law and Jeremiah Smith, Jr. Professor of Law, Harvard Law School; Author, Between Vengeance and Forgiveness: Facing History After Genocide and Mass Violence ïThis book makes an all too rare and important point: One of the distinguishing characteristics of social entrepreneurs is the way their actions and their example pave the way for peace. Kaufman gives us multiple examples here to demonstrate that the kind of empathetic leadership exhibited by these social entrepreneurs builds an alternative to conflict and contributes to the stability and security of societies.Í _ Dr. Diana Wells, President, Ashoka ïUnder the able editorship of Dr. Zachary Kaufman, an upstander in his own right, this pathbreaking book demystifies social entrepreneurship, namely, citizen-inspired initiatives that may have as much potential to overcome the challenges burdening victims of atrocities and other assaults on humankind as social media has demonstrated in revolutionizing how people communicate in the 21st Century.Í _ The Honorable David J. Scheffer, Mayer Brown / Robert A. Helman Professor of Law and Director, Center for International Human Rights, Northwestern University School of Law; former U.S. Ambassador at Large for War Crimes Issues; Author, All the Missing Souls: A Personal History of the War Crimes Tribunals ïThe accounts of social entrepreneurs contained in this volume could well inspire a future shortlist for the Nobel Peace Prize. Zachary Kaufman has coupled impressive narratives with compelling analysis in a collection that informs observers but that will also stimulate more young people to take up the challenges of responding to atrocities.Í _ Dr. William A. Schabas, Professor of International Law, Middlesex University (London); Author, Genocide in International Law: The Crime of Crimes; Commissioner, Sierra Leone Truth and Reconciliation Commission ïThis splendid book is more than a primer on social entrepreneurship for human rights in the developing world. It is also a compendium of searing testimony about the immense practical challenges that idealistic changemakers can overcome by dint of their unflagging energy, incandescent visions of humanity and justice, and on-the-ground skills and resourcefulness. Zachary Kaufman has performed a great public service in orchestrating this admirable volume about how hope for the future can be vindicated even under the most unpromising conditions.Í _ Peter H. Schuck, Simeon E. Baldwin Professor Emeritus of Law, Yale Law School ïAt last, a compelling narrative of the recent achievements to address pressing global issues through social entrepreneurship! This book is a tribute to the authorÍs ethical convictions and the generation of innovators that he represents. As Chairman of UNITAID, the first laboratory of innovative financing, IÍve seen how a small levy on airline tickets can save thousands of lives every year through market solutions. It warms me to see how young thinkers continue to innovate and act to provide global public goods. Pay attention to them!Í _ Philippe Douste-Blazy UN Under Secretary-General in charge of Innovative Financing for Development, Chairman of UNITAID and former French minister of foreign affairs ïAt a time when so many reflexively look to government action as a remedy for todayÍs ills, this valuable book demonstrates the power of social entrepreneurs to take on some of the worldÍs great challenges. Social entrepreneurship is grounded in real-world experience. The projects this book profiles demonstrate the impact of individuals as agents of change _ taking ideas and turning them into action that can help transform entire societies.Í _ Dr. Arthur C. Brooks, President, The American Enterprise Institute; Author, Social Entrepreneurship: A Modern Approach to Social Value Creation ïFor anyone who doubted one person could change the world or just wondered how to get started, Dr. KaufmanÍs book is equal parts inspiration and how-to guide. He has lived and studied social entrepreneurship, and provides a serious contribution to the emerging field of social entrepreneurship, particularly as it relates to genocide and other atrocities.Í _ The Honorable Tom Perriello, former U.S. Congressman; former Special Advisor to the Prosecutor, Special Court for Sierra Leone; Co-Founder, DarfurGenocide.org; current President & CEO, Center for American Progress Action ïSocial Entrepreneurship in the Age of Atrocities is a welcome contribution to the study of one of the most promising social movements in recent time, the mobilization of engaged citizens, or Upstanders, in the face of mass atrocities around the world. Zachary Kaufman incisively investigates how social entrepreneurs are taking on tough issues including conflict prevention and transitional justice, and presents practical lessons learned from the perspective of activists on the ground.Í _ John Prendergast, Co-Founder, Enough Project, Center for American Progress; former Director for African Affairs, U.S. National Security Council; Co-Author, Unlikely Brothers: Our Story of Adventure, Loss, and Redemption; Co-Author, Not on Our Watch: The Mission to End Genocide in Darfur and Beyond ïSocial Entrepreneurship in the Age of Atrocities interweaves two critical movements: social entrepreneurship and human rights. Kaufman is one of the first to explore these intersections in a powerfully informative way. He and his fellow social entrepreneurs provide concrete examples of, and offer practical advice about, the power of ordinary people to confront one of the most intractable problems: mass atrocities. Kaufman demonstrates how we can all be ñupstandersî in the face of such conflicts.Í _ Mark Hanis, Co-Founder & Board member of United to End Genocide (formerly Save Darfur / Genocide Intervention Network); Ashoka Fellow; Echoing Green Fellow ïDr. KaufmanÍs book is a huge addition to the field, and his focus [on atrocities] is spot on. Looking at social entrepreneurship through the lens offered in this book will provide the field with new insights and inspiration. Bravo!Í _ Peter Brinckerhoff, author of Smart Stewardship for Nonprofits: Making the Right Decision in Good Times and Bad and Social Entrepreneurship: The Art of Mission-Based Venture Development ïSocial Entrepreneurship in the Age of Atrocities deftly outlines how young global peace entrepreneurs are successfully fostering smart and agile solutions to some of the worldÍs most intractable problems. Gone are the tired images of doves and peace signs, rightfully replaced with laptops and smart phones. This is a must read for all young leaders who strive to have real impact in their careers, as well as the old guard if they care not to be left behind by the winds of change.Í _ Cameron M. Chisholm, Founder and President, International Peace & Security Institute ïIn an age of austerity, with governments and international organizations limited in their capacity to address atrocities, Dr. Zachary KaufmanÍs book is a timely reminder of the power of social entrepreneurs to effect critical change. But this is no romantic account of the ability of inspired individuals to make a difference after mass conflict. As an insidersÍ view of entrepreneurship, this book gives a warts-and-all account of the personal, political, social, and economic challenges that must be overcome and the energy, risk-taking, and good fortune required to achieve even modest results. Highlighting the crucial work of social entrepreneurs, this collection also provides a necessary critique of the failures of governments and international bodies such as the UN to respond coherently to the challenges of post-conflict societies.Í _ Dr. Phil Clark, Lecturer in Comparative and International Politics, School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London; Co-Founder, Oxford Transitional Justice Research, University of Oxford; Author, The Gacaca Courts, Post-Genocide Justice and Reconciliation in Rwanda: Justice Without Lawyers; Co-Editor, After Genocide: Transitional Justice, Post-Conflict Reconstruction, and Reconciliation in Rwanda and Beyond ïSocial Entrepreneurship in the Age of Atrocities is a bold work of definition and analyses. It presents both concepts and histories _ focused on individuals and groups _ in response to mass violence and atrocities. This significant study, edited by Zachary Kaufman, is a work of clarification and inspiration.Í _ Dr. Judith S. Goldstein, Founder and Executive Director, Humanity in Action ïThis book is nothing less than an antidote against despondency. In and of itself an innovation, Dr. Zachary KaufmanÍs collection of personal narratives by change agents reveals a pattern of how people are bringing light to areas where there seems to be nothing but darkness. The remarkably simple recipe of these social entrepreneurs is to take a good dose of caring, add an innovative solution, and finally knead the project through the phases of iterative testing and growth until impact is achieved. Finally we have in this book an addition to the ever-growing library of literature on human rights and atrocities that is not a call to arms or a cry of accusatory indignation, but a cheerful invitation to roll up oneÍs sleeves.Í _ Dr. Fernande Raine, Social Innovation Leader, Innosight; former Senior Team Member, Ashoka; former management consultant, McKinsey & Company; former Executive Director, Carr Center for Human Rights Policy, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University ïDr. Zachary Kaufman provides powerful lessons for anyone committed to preventing atrocities, ending conflicts, building peace, and fostering systematic and sustainable positive social change. The compelling and honest first-hand accounts by leading social entrepreneurs working in diverse sectoral areas help ground the field by providing unique insight into the many opportunities, successes, and challenges encountered through the difficult task of change making. This powerful text will inspire many young people and others to take action and work hard in pursuing innovative ways to address some of the most complex, seemingly intractable problems facing the world today. This book should be required reading for anyone seeking to positively impact the world, one step at a time.Í _ Dr. Craig Zelizer, Associate Director, Conflict Resolution Program, Georgetown University; Founder, Peace and Collaborative Development Network ïZachary KaufmanÍs new book expands the term social entrepreneur to include human rights advocates _ in this instance, young people from the Global North, who have chosen to speak out, stand up, and intervene in the complex contexts of war, atrocity, and civil conflict. KaufmanÍs provocative book includes case studies that will help challenge prevailing definitions of this emerging field as it explores how, where, and why social entrepreneurs are engaging with the intersection of geo-politics, international law, and social change.Í _ Kavita N. Ramdas, Executive Director, Program on Social Entrepreneurship, Stanford University; former President & CEO, Global Fund for Women Social Entrepreneurship in the Age of Atrocities provides crucial insight into social entrepreneurship from visionaries in the field as well as other experienced practitioners and renowned theorists. While this book focuses on social entrepreneurship as it relates to genocide and other atrocities, the experiences and lessons learned also apply to additional critical social, economic, legal and political problems such as healthcare, development, education and literacy. The authors in this book address the clear need for further examination of social entrepreneurship. They discuss the challenges, obstacles and opportunities of the field and lend new insight to the concept, history and methodologies of social entrepreneurship. The book profiles case studies based on some of the most innovative and effective social enterprises addressing atrocities, including the National Vision for Sierra Leone, Asylum Access, the Kigali Public Library, Indego Africa, Generation Rwanda, Orphans Against AIDS, Americans for Informed Democracy, and Children of Abraham. Social Entrepreneurship in the Age of Atrocities will inform, instruct and build the community of social entrepreneurs. This unique, essential collection of first-hand accounts is an inspiring and informative addition to the evolving social entrepreneurship literature. It will be of particular interest to social entrepreneurs; students, scholars and practitioners of business, management, public policy, social policy and development studies; anyone with a philanthropic mindset; and all those who are invested in creating and maintaining a socially responsible, accountable world.
Death, Image, Memory
Author: Piotr Cieplak
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137579889
Pages: 230
Year: 2018-06-12
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This book explores how photography and documentary film have participated in the representation of the 1994 genocide in Rwanda and its aftermath. This in-depth analysis of professional and amateur photography and the work of Rwandan and international filmmakers offers an insight into not only the unique ability of images to engage with death, memory and the need for evidence, but also their helplessness and inadequacy when confronted with the enormity of the event. Focusing on a range of films and photographs, the book tests notions of truth, evidence, record and witnessing – so often associated with documentary practice – in the specific context of Rwanda and the wider representational framework of African conflict and suffering. Death, Image, Memory is an inquiry into the multiple memorial and evidentiary functions of images that transcends the usual investigations into whether photography and documentary film can reliably attest to the occurrence and truth of an event.
Promoting and Producing Evil
Author: Nancy Billias
Publisher: Rodopi
ISBN: 9042029390
Pages: 308
Year: 2010
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The essays in this volume provide rich fodder for reflection on topics that are of urgent interest to all thinking people. Each one suggests new ways to contemplate our own role(s) in the production and promotion of evil. The authors encourage the reader to be challenged, outraged, and disturbed by what you read here. The eighth gathering of Global Perspectives on Evil and Human Wickedness, which took place in Salzburg in March 2007, provided a look at evil past, present, and future, from a broad spectrum of disciplinary perspectives. Papers were presented on the Holocaust, genocide, violence, sadism, pædophilia, physical, verbal, and visual weapons of mass destruction, and on the effects of a variety of media on our apperception of and responses to evil. One of the overarching themes that emerged was the ethical role of the observer or witness to evil, the sense that all of our writings are, in an echo of Thomas Merton's salient phrase, the conjectures of guilty bystanders. The notion of complicity was examined from a number of angles, and imbued the gathering with a sense of urgency: that our common goal was to engender change by raising awareness of the countless and ubiquitous ways in which evil can be actively or passively carried on and promoted. The papers selected for this volume provide a representative sample of the lively, provocative, and often disturbing discussions that took place over the course of that conference. This volume also contains a few papers from a sister conference, Cultures of Violence, which was held in Oxford in 2004. These papers have been included here because of their striking relevance to the themes that emerged in the Evil conference of 2007. At the Interface/Probing the Boundaries seeks to encourage and promote cutting edge interdisciplinary and multi-disciplinary projects and inquiry. By bringing people together from differing contexts, disciplines, professions, and vocations, the aim is to engage in conversations that are innovative, imaginative, and creatively interactive. Inter-Disciplinary dialogue enables people to go beyond the boundaries of what they usually encounter and share in perspectives that are new, challenging, and richly rewarding. This kind of dialogue often illuminates one's own area of work, is suggestive of new possibilities for development, and creates exciting horizons for future conversations with persons from a wide variety of national and international settings. By sharing cross-disciplinary insights and perspectives, ATI/PTB publications are designed to be both exploratory examinations of particular areas and issues, and rigorous inquiries into specific subjects. Books in the series are enabling resources which will encourage sustained and creative dialogue, and become the future resource for further inquiries and research.
When Victims Become Killers
Author: Mahmood Mamdani
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400851726
Pages: 384
Year: 2014-04-28
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"When we captured Kigali, we thought we would face criminals in the state; instead, we faced a criminal population." So a political commissar in the Rwanda Patriotic Front reflected after the 1994 massacre of as many as one million Tutsis in Rwanda. Underlying his statement is the realization that, though ordered by a minority of state functionaries, the slaughter was performed by hundreds of thousands of ordinary citizens, including even judges, human rights activists, and doctors, nurses, priests, friends, and spouses of the victims. Indeed, it is its very popularity that makes the Rwandan genocide so unthinkable. This book makes it thinkable. Rejecting easy explanations of the genocide as a mysterious evil force that was bizarrely unleashed, one of Africa's best-known intellectuals situates the tragedy in its proper context. He coaxes to the surface the historical, geographical, and political forces that made it possible for so many Hutu to turn so brutally on their neighbors. He finds answers in the nature of political identities generated during colonialism, in the failures of the nationalist revolution to transcend these identities, and in regional demographic and political currents that reach well beyond Rwanda. In so doing, Mahmood Mamdani usefully broadens understandings of citizenship and political identity in postcolonial Africa. There have been few attempts to explain the Rwandan horror, and none has succeeded so well as this one. Mamdani's analysis provides a solid foundation for future studies of the massacre. Even more important, his answers point a way out of crisis: a direction for reforming political identity in central Africa and preventing future tragedies.
The Shadow of Imana
Author: Véronique Tadjo
Publisher: Waveland Press
ISBN: 1478629533
Pages: 118
Year: 2015-03-04
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As evidence emerged of the genocide in Rwanda in 1994, the outside world reeled in shock. What could have motivated these individual and collective acts of evil? In 1998, Véronique Tadjo traveled to Rwanda to try to find out. She started with the premise that what happened in Rwanda concerns us all: “We need to understand. Our humanity is in peril.” The Shadow of Imana is a reminder that humankind the world over is capable of genocide. Records of what the author saw—sites of massacres, corpses, weapons dumps—are combined with personal stories of traumatized returnees, bereaved survivors, rape victims, orphans, lawyers faced with the impossible task of doing justice, prisoners. But Tadjo’s story goes beyond mere reportage of death and cruelty. Her poetically wrought account incorporates traditional tales, explores the spiritual legacy of the genocide, and uncovers a healing vitality as well as a commitment to forgiveness. Véronique Tadjo was born in Paris and grew up in Côte d’Ivoire. The Shadow of Imana has been translated from the French by Véronique Wakerley.
The Failure to Prevent Genocide in Rwanda
Author: Fred Grünfeld, Anke Huijboom
Publisher: BRILL
ISBN: 9047431316
Pages: 329
Year: 2007-05-23
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This volume is about the failure to prevent genocide in Rwanda in 1994. In particular, the research focuses on why the early warnings of an emerging genocide were not translated into early preventative action. The warnings were well documented by the most authoritative source, the Canadian U.N. peace-keeping commander General Romeo Dallaire and sent to the leading political civil servants in New York. The communications and the decisionmaking are scrutinized, i.e., who received what messages at what time, to whom the messages were forwarded and which (non-) decisions were taken in response to the alarming reports of weapon deliveries and atrocities. This book makes clear that this genocide could have been prevented.
Techno-bandits
Author: Linda Melvern, Nick Anning, David Leroy Hebditch
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN:
Pages: 313
Year: 1984-01-01
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An investigative report on the Soviet campaign to obtain high-technology information and devices details the activities of black-market business suppliers, American and European spies and quasi-spies, and KGB agents
The Ultimate Crime
Author: Linda Melvern
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages: 442
Year: 1995
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Published to coincide with the 50th anniversary of the founding of the United Nations, a title which is the basis for the Channel 4 series UN BLUES, which reveals how and why the original dream behind the conception of the United Nations has died, and how the UN is prevented from fulfilling its purpose.
The End of the Street
Author: Linda Melvern
Publisher: Methuen Publishing
ISBN:
Pages: 276
Year: 1986-01-01
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Demonic Males
Author: Richard W. Wrangham, Dale Peterson
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN: 0395877431
Pages: 350
Year: 1996
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Draws on recent discoveries about human evolution to examine whether violence among men is a product of their primitive heritage, and searches for solutions to the problems of war, rape, and murder