Divorce Family Structure And The Academic Success Of Children.php Book PDF, EPUB Download & Read Online Free

Divorce, Family Structure, and the Academic Success of Children
Author: William Jeynes
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136398112
Pages: 228
Year: 2012-12-06
View: 741
Read: 815
Trace the influence of family factors on children's emotional and educational well-being! The effect of family changes on children's academic success is a new subject for study. Divorce, Family Structure, and the Academic Success of Children is a comprehensive volume that brings research on this hotly debated topic up to date. With clear tables and incisive arguments, it is a single-volume reference on this vexing sociocultural problem. Divorce, Family Structure, and the Academic Success of Children offers a close look at the historical background and current theory of this field of study. But it is more than a compendium of known facts and completed studies. It examines issues of appropriate methodology and points out concerns for planning future research. Divorce, Family Structure, and the Academic Success of Children summarizes current knowledge of the effects of various influences on children's emotional and educational well-being, including: divorce and remarriage single-parent families nontraditional family structures race socioeconomic status mobility Educators, theorists, sociologists, and psychologists will find this volume an essential resource. With hundreds of useful references and clear organization, it presents new ideas in an easy-to-use format that makes it an ideal textbook as well.
Growing Up with a Single Parent
Author: Sarah McLanahan, Gary Sandefur
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674040864
Pages: 208
Year: 2009-06
View: 1138
Read: 376
Nonwhite and white, rich and poor, born to an unwed mother or weathering divorce, over half of all children in the current generation will live in a single-parent family--and these children simply will not fare as well as their peers who live with both parents. This is the clear and urgent message of this powerful book. Based on four national surveys and drawing on more than a decade of research, "Growing Up with a Single Parent" sharply demonstrates the connection between family structure and a child's prospects for success. What are the chances that the child of a single parent will graduate from high school, go on to college, find and keep a job? Will she become a teenage mother? Will he be out of school and out of work? These are the questions the authors pursue across the spectrum of race, gender, and class. Children whose parents live apart, the authors find, are twice as likely to drop out of high school as those in two-parent families, one and a half times as likely to be idle in young adulthood, twice as likely to become single parents themselves. This study shows how divorce--particularly an attendant drop in income, parental involvement, and access to community resources--diminishes children's chances for well-being. The authors provide answers to other practical questions that many single parents may ask: Does the gender of the child or the custodial parent affect these outcomes? Does having a stepparent, a grandmother, or a nonmarital partner in the household help or hurt? Do children who stay in the same community after divorce fare better? Their data reveal that some of the advantages often associated with being white are really a function of family structure, and that some of the advantages associated with having educated parents evaporate when those parents separate. In a concluding chapter, McLanahan and Sandefur offer clear recommendations for rethinking our current policies. Single parents are here to stay, and their worsening situation is tearing at the fabric of our society. It is imperative, the authors show, that we shift more of the costs of raising children from mothers to fathers and from parents to society at large. Likewise, we must develop universal assistance programs that benefit low-income two-parent families as well as single mothers. Startling in its findings and trenchant in its analysis, "Growing Up with a Single Parent" will serve to inform both the personal decisions and governmental policies that affect our children's--and our nation's--future.
Between Two Worlds
Author: Elizabeth Marquardt
Publisher: Harmony
ISBN: 0307352706
Pages: 288
Year: 2006-09-26
View: 468
Read: 194
An astonishing one quarter of adults between the ages of eighteen and thirty-five have grown up in divorced families. Now, as this generation comes of age, Between Two Worlds will speak to them like no other book. Marquardt’s data is undeniably compelling, but at the heart of her book are stories—of reunions with one parent that were always partings from the other, of struggles to adapt to a parent’s moods, of the burden of having to figure out the important questions in life alone. Authoritative, beautifully written, and filled with brave, sad, unflinchingly honest voices, Between Two Worlds is a book of transforming power for the adult children of divorce, whose real experiences have for too long gone unrecognized. Based on a pioneering new study, Between Two Worlds is a book of transforming power for anyone who grew up with divorced parents.
Family Life Education With Diverse Populations
Author: Sharon M. Ballard, Alan C. Taylor
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 1412991781
Pages: 317
Year: 2011-12-05
View: 378
Read: 1155
Family and human service professionals in a variety of disciplines engage in family life education, which is designed to strengthen, enrich, and empower families. This includes many content areas such as couple and parent-child relationships, balancing work and family, parenting, financial literacy, interpersonal communication, and sexuality. The authors bridge the gap between research and practice by examining and presenting key strategies for working with diverse populations including those based on race and ethnicity, family structure, geographic location, and context. By defining eleven diverse groups and presenting their strengths and unique cultural characteristics, the authors present an evidence-based practice approach with each chapter, prescribing the best practices for working with these diverse groups in regard to general FLE needs, educator characteristics, ethical considerations, marketing and recruitment, modes of learning, and environmental considerations. This book is essential for students who are preparing to work with families, as well as professionals engaging in FLE activities with diverse populations.
America in the Age of Trump
Author: Douglas E. Schoen, Jessica Tarlov
Publisher: Encounter Books
ISBN: 1641770139
Pages: 344
Year: 2018-10-23
View: 609
Read: 771
America in the Age of Trump is a bracing, essential look at the failure of a great nation to meet the needs of its people and the challenges of the age—and the resulting collapse of public trust in government, as well as a pervasive crisis of national values, from broken families to a loss of faith in the American idea itself. This crisis of values occurs just as the country faces an unprecedented array of fiscal, economic, social, and national-security challenges—out of control federal spending, frighteningly large deficits, massive gaps of income and opportunity, cultural division, and a dangerous world in which American power seems increasingly incidental. In America in the Age of Trump, Douglas E. Schoen and Jessica Tarlov offer a definitive and unique assessment of a nation in turmoil, looking beneath well-known problems to identify underlying yet poorly understood causes. Readers will confront the crises, one by one: of trust, values, and governance; of education, economic opportunity, and fiscal solvency; of national security, domestic tranquility, and race relations. America in the Age of Trump gathers in one place a clear and comprehensive evaluation of the fundamental issues confronting the American future while offering bold, fresh approaches to meeting these challenges. Other books have described the specter of American decline, but none has been so comprehensive in its diagnosis or forward-looking—and non-ideological—in its remedies, explaining how we might yet overcome national self-doubt to reclaim our traditional optimism, reassert our place in the world, and secure a prosperous future for our citizens.
Mom's House, Dad's House for Kids
Author: Isolina Ricci
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1416595724
Pages: 272
Year: 2007-11-01
View: 1196
Read: 1310
From the author of the classic Mom’s House, Dad’s House, the essential guide for kids on how to stay strong and succeed in life when parents separate, divorce, or get married again. Isolina Ricci’s Mom’s House, Dad’s House has been the gold standard for inspiring and supporting divorcing and remarrying parents for more than twenty-five years. With her new book, Dr. Isa adapts her time-tested advice on maneuvering the emotional, logistical, and legal realities of separation, divorce, and stepfamilies to speak directly to children. Alongside practical ways to cope with big changes she offers older children and their families key resiliency tools that kids can use now and the rest of their lives. Kids and families are encouraged to believe in themselves, to take heart, and to plan for their lives ahead. Mom’s House, Dad’s House for Kids is packed with practical tips, frank answers, easy-to-use lists, “train your brain” ideas, reproducible worksheets, and things to try when words just won’t come out right. Kids will learn how to: · Deal with parents living apart, schedules, and dueling house rules · Settle comfortably in one home or two · Stay out of the “miserable middle” when parents fight · Manage stress, guilt, change, fear, and other feelings · Stay connected with parents, relatives, and the “right” friends · Appreciate the gifts (and deal with the gripes) of their new version of family · Feel better FAST! Kids can’t get their parents back together, but they can help themselves get stronger and go on to succeed in life. This book shows them how.
The War Against Boys
Author: Christina Hoff Sommers
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1501125427
Pages: 288
Year: 2015-09-01
View: 192
Read: 907
An updated and revised edition of the controversial classic--now more relevant than ever--argues that boys are the ones languishing socially and academically, resulting in staggering social and economic costs. Girls and women were once second-class citizens in the nation's schools. Americans responded w ith concerted efforts to give girls and women the attention and assistance that was long overdue. Now, after two major waves of feminism and decades of policy reform, women have made massive strides in education. Today they outperform men in nearly every measure of social, academic, and vocational well-being. Christina Hoff Sommers contends that it's time to take a hard look at present-day realities and recognize that boys need help. Called "provocative and controversial . . . impassioned and articulate" ("The Christian Science M"onitor), this edition of "The War Against Boys" offers a new preface and six radically revised chapters, plus updates on the current status of boys throughout the book. Sommers argues that the problem of male underachievement is persistent and worsening. Among the new topics Sommers tackles: how the war against boys is harming our economic future, and how boy-averse trends such as the decline of recess and zero-tolerance disciplinary policies have turned our schools into hostile environments for boys. As our schools become more feelings-centered, risk-averse, competition-free, and sedentary, they move further and further from the characteristic needs of boys. She offers realistic, achievable solutions to these problems that include boy-friendly pedagogy, character and vocational education, and the choice of single-sex classrooms. "The War Against Boys" is an incisive, rigorous, and heartfelt argument in favor of recognizing and confronting a new reality: boys are languishing in education and the price of continued neglect is economically and socially prohibitive.
A Treatise on the Family, Enlarged Edition
Author: Gary Stanley BECKER, Gary S Becker
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674020669
Pages: 304
Year: 2009-06-30
View: 496
Read: 1171

Children and Separation
Author: Kwame Owusu-Bempah
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317603192
Pages: 208
Year: 2014-09-03
View: 952
Read: 942
Childhood separation and loss have become virtually a way of life for a large number of children throughout the world. Children separated from their genetic parent(s) and consequently their genealogical, social and cultural roots due to processes such as adoption, parental divorce/separation, donor insemination, single parenthood by choice and child trafficking can face social, emotional and psychological difficulties. This book explores the premise that a proper understanding of the complex inner world of modern day separated children and their psycho-social development requires a shift in focus or emphasis. It presents the notion of socio-genealogical connectedness as a new theoretical framework for studying and promoting these children's growth and development. This new theory simultaneously challenges and complements existing notions of psycho-social development, including attachment theory and Erikson's psycho-social theory of personality development. Owusu-Bempah proposes that this sense of socio-genealogical connectedness is an essential factor in children's adjustment to separation and their emotional and mental health; much like those adopted, separated children suffer a loss of genealogical continuity, and hence, loss of 'self'. This hypothesis is discussed and ultimately supported through both the author's own research and a broad selection of theoretical and empirical material from other areas. The book further considers the implications of this notion of socio-genealogical connectedness for childcare policy and practice, as well as directions for future research in this and related fields. Children and Separation is an invaluable resource for academics, students and childcare professionals. The accessible style of the book ensures that it will also be useful to parents and anybody affected by childhood separation.
Ambiguous Loss
Author: Pauline BOSS, Pauline Boss
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674028589
Pages: 176
Year: 2009-06-30
View: 889
Read: 689
When a loved one dies we mourn our loss. We take comfort in the rituals that mark the passing, and we turn to those around us for support. But what happens when there is no closure, when a family member or a friend who may be still alive is lost to us nonetheless? How, for example, does the mother whose soldier son is missing in action, or the family of an Alzheimer's patient who is suffering from severe dementia, deal with the uncertainty surrounding this kind of loss? In this sensitive and lucid account, Pauline Boss explains that, all too often, those confronted with such ambiguous loss fluctuate between hope and hopelessness. Suffered too long, these emotions can deaden feeling and make it impossible for people to move on with their lives. Yet the central message of this book is that they can move on. Drawing on her research and clinical experience, Boss suggests strategies that can cushion the pain and help families come to terms with their grief. Her work features the heartening narratives of those who cope with ambiguous loss and manage to leave their sadness behind, including those who have lost family members to divorce, immigration, adoption, chronic mental illness, and brain injury. With its message of hope, this eloquent book offers guidance and understanding to those struggling to regain their lives. Table of Contents: 1. Frozen Grief 2. Leaving without Goodbye 3. Goodbye without Leaving 4. Mixed Emotions 5. Ups and Downs 6. The Family Gamble 7. The Turning Point 8. Making Sense out of Ambiguity 9. The Benefit of a Doubt Notes Acknowledgments Reviews of this book: You will find yourself thinking about the issues discussed in this book long after you put it down and perhaps wishing you had extra copies for friends and family members who might benefit from knowing that their sorrows are not unique...This book's value lies in its giving a name to a force many of us will confront--sadly, more than once--and providing personal stories based on 20 years of interviews and research. --Pamela Gerhardt, Washington Post Reviews of this book: A compassionate exploration of the effects of ambiguous loss and how those experiencing it handle this most devastating of losses ... Boss's approach is to encourage families to talk together, to reach a consensus about how to mourn that which has been lost and how to celebrate that which remains. Her simple stories of families doing just that contain lessons for all. Insightful, practical, and refreshingly free of psychobabble. --Kirkus Review Reviews of this book: Engagingly written and richly rewarding, this title presents what Boss has learned from many years of treating individuals and families suffering from uncertain or incomplete loss...The obvious depth of the author's understanding of sufferers of ambiguous loss and the facility with which she communicates that understanding make this a book to be recommended. --R. R. Cornellius, Choice Reviews of this book: Written for a wide readership, the concepts of ambiguous loss take immediate form through the many provocative examples and stories Boss includes, All readers will find stories with which they will relate...Sensitive, grounded and practical, this book should, in my estimation, be required reading for family practitioners. --Ted Bowman, Family Forum Reviews of this book: Dr. Boss describes [the] all-too-common phenomenon [of unresolved grief] as resulting from either of two circumstances: when the lost person is still physically present but emotionally absent or when the lost person is physically absent but still emotionally present. In addition to senility, physical presence but psychological absence may result, for example, when a person is suffering from a serious mental disorder like schizophrenia or depression or debilitating neurological damage from an accident or severe stroke, when a person abuses drugs or alcohol, when a child is autistic or when a spouse is a workaholic who is not really 'there' even when he or she is at home...Cases of physical absence with continuing psychological presence typically occur when a soldier is missing in action, when a child disappears and is not found, when a former lover or spouse is still very much missed, when a child 'loses' a parent to divorce or when people are separated from their loved ones by immigration...Professionals familiar with Dr. Boss's work emphasised that people suffering from ambiguous loss were not mentally ill, but were just stuck and needed help getting past the barrier or unresolved grief so that they could get on with their lives. --Asian Age Combining her talents as a compassionate family therapist and a creative researcher, Pauline Boss eloquently shows the many and complex ways that people can cope with the inevitable losses in contemporary family life. A wise book, and certain to become a classic. --Constance R. Ahrons, author of The Good Divorce A powerful and healing book. Families experiencing ambiguous loss will find strategies for seeing what aspects of their loved ones remain, and for understanding and grieving what they have lost. Pauline Boss offers us both insight and clarity. --Kathy Weingarten, Ph.D, The Family Institute of Cambridge, Harvard Medical School
The Popular Encyclopedia of Christian Counseling
Author: Dr Tim Clinton, Dr Ron Hawkins
Publisher: Harvest House Publishers
ISBN: 0736943579
Pages: 576
Year: 2011-09-01
View: 732
Read: 395
Seasoned counselors and professors Tim Clinton and Ron Hawkins provide a landmark reference that offers a capstone definition of the emerging profession and ministry of the Christian counselor. Appropriate for professional counselors, lay counselors, pastors, students, and teachers, it includes nearly 300 entries by nearly 100 top Christian counselors. This practical guide focuses on functional aspects of Christian counseling and explores such important topics as...Christian counseling as a profession, ministry, and lay ministry; Spiritual and theological roots; Social, emotional, and relational issues; Skills and essentials in Christian helping; Ethical and legal considerations; Intake, assessment, diagnosis, and treatment planning; and Premarital counseling, family therapy, and substance abuse. Counselors will also find up-to-date information on solution-based brief therapy, cognitive therapy and biblical truth, and trauma and crisis intervention. An essential resource for maintaining a broad and up-to-date perspective on helping others.
Homeward Bound
Author: Elaine Tyler May
Publisher: Basic Books
ISBN: 0786723467
Pages: 320
Year: 2008-09-23
View: 1326
Read: 1146
A revised edition of the classic, myth-shattering exploration of American family life during the Cold War. When Homeward Bound first appeared in 1988, it forever changed how we understand Cold War America. Elaine Tyler May demonstrated that the Atomic Age and the Cold War shaped American life not just in national politics, but at every level of society, from the boardroom to the bedroom. Her notion of "domestic containment" is now the standard interpretation of the era, and Homeward Bound has become a classic. This new edition includes an updated introduction and a new epilogue examining the legacy of Cold War obsessions with personal and family security in the present day.
Second Chances
Author: Judith S. Wallerstein, Sandra Blakeslee
Publisher:
ISBN: 0544311833
Pages: 354
Year: 2004-05
View: 762
Read: 782

Commonwealth
Author: Ann Patchett
Publisher: HarperCollins
ISBN: 0062491814
Pages: 336
Year: 2016-09-13
View: 697
Read: 797
#1 New York Times Bestseller The acclaimed, bestselling author—winner of the PEN/Faulkner Award and the Orange Prize—tells the enthralling story of how an unexpected romantic encounter irrevocably changes two families’ lives. One Sunday afternoon in Southern California, Bert Cousins shows up at Franny Keating’s christening party uninvited. Before evening falls, he has kissed Franny’s mother, Beverly—thus setting in motion the dissolution of their marriages and the joining of two families. Spanning five decades, Commonwealth explores how this chance encounter reverberates through the lives of the four parents and six children involved. Spending summers together in Virginia, the Keating and Cousins children forge a lasting bond that is based on a shared disillusionment with their parents and the strange and genuine affection that grows up between them. When, in her twenties, Franny begins an affair with the legendary author Leon Posen and tells him about her family, the story of her siblings is no longer hers to control. Their childhood becomes the basis for his wildly successful book, ultimately forcing them to come to terms with their losses, their guilt, and the deeply loyal connection they feel for one another. Told with equal measures of humor and heartbreak, Commonwealth is a meditation on inspiration, interpretation, and the ownership of stories. It is a brilliant and tender tale of the far-reaching ties of love and responsibility that bind us together.
The Science of Adolescent Risk-Taking:
Author: Institute of Medicine, Board on Children, Youth, and Families, Committee on the Science of Adolescence, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education, National Research Council
Publisher: National Academies Press
ISBN: 0309158524
Pages: 144
Year: 2011-01-25
View: 309
Read: 575
Adolescence is a time when youth make decisions, both good and bad, that have consequences for the rest of their lives. Some of these decisions put them at risk of lifelong health problems, injury, or death. The Institute of Medicine held three public workshops between 2008 and 2009 to provide a venue for researchers, health care providers, and community leaders to discuss strategies to improve adolescent health.