Double V The Civil Rights Struggle Of The Tuskegee Airmen Book PDF, EPUB Download & Read Online Free

Double V
Author: Lawrence P. Scott, William M. Womack
Publisher: MSU Press
ISBN: 0870139533
Pages: 330
Year: 1998-12-31
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On April 12, 1945, the United States Army Air Force arrested 101 of its African American officers. They were charged with disobeying a direct order from a superior officer—a charge that could carry the death penalty upon conviction. They were accused of refusing to sign an order that would have placed them in segregated housing and recreational facilities. Their plight was virtually ignored by the press at the time, and books written about the subject did not detail the struggle these aviators underwent to win recognition of their civil rights. The central theme of Double V is the promise held out to African American military personnel that service in World War II would deliver to them a double victory—a "double V"—over tyranny abroad and racial prejudice at home. The book's authors, Lawrence P. Scott and William M. Womack Sr., chronicle for the first time, in detail, one of America's most dramatic failures to deliver on that promise. In the course of their narrative, the authors demonstrate how the Tuskegee airmen suffered as second-class citizens while risking their lives to serve their country. Among the contributions made by this work is a detailed examination of how 101 Tuskegee airmen, by refusing to live in segregated quarters, triggered one of the most significant judicial proceedings in U.S. military history. Double V uses oral accounts and heretofore unused government documents to portray this little-known struggle by one of America's most celebrated flying units. In addition to providing background material about African American aviators before World War II. the authors also demonstrate how the Tuskegee airmen's struggle foretold dilemmas faced by the civil rights movement in the second half of the 20th century. Double V is destined to become an important contribution in the rapidly growing body of civil rights literature.
Double V
Author: Lawrence P. Scott, William M. Womack
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages: 322
Year: 1994
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On April 12, 1945, as Americans mourned the death of President Roosevelt, another tragic event went completely unnoticed - the United States Army Air Force arrested 101 African-American officers. They were charged with disobeying a direct order from a superior officer - a charge that carried the death penalty upon conviction. They had refused to sign an order that would have placed them in segregated housing and recreational facilities. Their plight was virtually ignored by the white majority press at the time, and books written about the subject - until now - did not reveal the human rights struggles of these aviators. The central theme of Double V is the promise held out to African-American military personnel that World War II would deliver to them a double victory, or "double v" - over tyranny abroad and racial prejudice at home. The book's authors, Lawrence P. Scott and William M. Womack Sr. chronicle in detail, and for the first time, one of America's most dramatic failures to deliver on that promise. In the course of their narrative the authors demonstrate how the Tuskegee Airmen suffered as second-class citizens while risking their lives to defend their country. Among the contributions made by this work is a detailed examination of how 101 Tuskegee Airmen, by refusing to live in segregated quarters, triggered one of the most significant judicial proceedings in U.S. military history. Double V uses oral accounts and heretofore unused government documents to portray this little-known struggle by one of America's most celebrated flying units. In addition to providing much background material about African-American aviators before World War II, the authors also demonstrate how the Tuskegee Airmen's struggle foretold dilemmas that would be faced by the civil rights movement in the second half of the 20th century. It is a work that will be of compelling interest to those who wish to know how America treated minorities during World War II; Double V also is destined to become an important contribution in the rapidly growing body of civil rights literature.
Freedom Flyers
Author: J. Todd Moye
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199896550
Pages: 256
Year: 2012-02-16
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Chronicles America's first African American military pilots, who fought againt two enemies, the Axis powers of World War II and Jim Crow racism in the United States.
The Double V
Author: Rawn James, Jr.
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA
ISBN: 1608196224
Pages: 304
Year: 2014-03-25
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The century-long struggle to achieve equality for America's black soldiers and sailors, in a stirring narrative history by the author of Root and Branch
The African American Experience during World War II
Author: Neil A. Wynn
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
ISBN: 1442200170
Pages: 200
Year: 2010-05-16
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World War II was crucial in the development of the emerging Civil Rights movement, whether through the economic and social impact of the war, or through demands for equality in the military. This period was characterized by an intense transformation of black hopes and expectations, encouraged by real socio-economic shifts and departures in federal policy. During the war, black self consciousness found powerful expression in new movements such as the "Double V" campaign that linked the fight for democracy at home for the fight for democracy abroad.
Father of the Tuskegee Airmen, John C. Robinson
Author: Phillip Thomas Tucker
Publisher: Potomac Books, Inc.
ISBN: 1597974870
Pages: 352
Year: 2012-02-01
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Across black America during the Golden Age of Aviation, John C. Robinson was widely acclaimed as the long-awaited “black Lindbergh.” Robinson’s fame, which rivaled that of Joe Louis and Jesse Owens, came primarily from his wartime role as the commander of the Imperial Ethiopian Air Force after Italy invaded Ethiopia in 1935. As the only African American who served during the war’s entirety, the Mississippi-born Robinson garnered widespread recognition, sparking an interest in aviation for young black men and women. Known as the “Brown Condor of Ethiopia,” he provided a symbolic moral example to an entire generation of African Americans. While white America remained isolationist, Robinson fought on his own initiative against the march of fascism to protect Africa’s only independent black nation. Robinson’s wartime role in Ethiopia made him America’s foremost black aviator. Robinson made other important contributions that predated the Italo-Ethiopian War. After graduating from Tuskegee Institute, Robinson led the way in breaking racial barriers in Chicago, becoming the first black student and teacher at one of the most prestigious aeronautical schools in the United States, the Curtiss-Wright Aeronautical School. In May 1934, Robinson first planted the seed for the establishment of an aviation school at Tuskegee Institute. While Robinson’s involvement with Tuskegee was only a small part of his overall contribution to opening the door for blacks in aviation, the success of the Tuskegee Airmen—the first African American military aviators in the U.S. armed forces—is one of the most recognized achievements in twentieth-century African American history.
Black Knights
Author: Homan, Lynn, Thomas Reilly
Publisher: Pelican Publishing
ISBN: 145560125X
Pages: 336
Year: 2001-01-31
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The story of the men and women who served at Tuskegee Army Air Field from 1941 to 1946.
Fighting for America
Author: Christopher Paul Moore
Publisher: One World
ISBN: 0307415228
Pages: 400
Year: 2007-12-18
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The African-American contribution to winning World War II has never been celebrated as profoundly as in Fighting for America. In this inspirational and uniquely personal tribute, the essential part played by black servicemen and -women in that cataclysmic conflict is brought home. Here are letters, photographs, oral histories, and rare documents, collected by historian Christopher Moore, the son of two black WWII veterans. Weaving his family history with that of his people and nation, Moore has created an unforgettable tapestry of sacrifice, fortitude, and courage. From the 1,800 black soldiers who landed at Normandy Beach on D-Day, and the legendary Tuskegee Airmen who won ninety-five Distinguished Flying Crosses, to the 761st Tank Battalion who, under General Patton, helped liberate Nazi death camps, the invaluable effort of black Americans to defend democracy is captured in word and image. Readers will be introduced to many unheralded heroes who helped America win the war, including Dorie Miller, the messman who manned a machine gun and downed four Japanese planes; Robert Brooks, the first American to die in armored battle; Lt. Jackie Robinson, the future baseball legend who faced court-martial for refusing to sit in the back of a military bus; an until now forgotten African-American philosopher who helped save many lives at a Japanese POW camp; even the author’s own parents: his mother, Kay, a WAC when she met his father, Bill, who was part of the celebrated Red Ball Express. Yet Fighting for America is more than a testimonial; it is also a troubling story of profound contradictions, of a country still in the throes of segregation, of a domestic battleground where arrests and riots occurred simultaneously with foreign service–and of how the war helped spotlight this disparity and galvanize the need for civil rights. Featuring a unique perspective on black soldiers, Fighting for America will move any reader: all who, like the author, owe their lives to those who served.
Double Victory
Author: Ronald Takaki
Publisher: Back Bay Books
ISBN: 0316831565
Pages: 304
Year: 2001-07-30
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From a Navajo code talker to a Tuskegee pilot, Takaki examines the many contributions and sacrifices of America's minorities--blacks, Chinese, Native Americans and others--during World War II. Photos.
Tuskegee Airmen
Author: Barry M. Stentiford
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 0313386846
Pages: 223
Year: 2011-08-31
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• 16 original documents relating to the creation and performance of the Tuskegee Airmen during World War II, each accompanied by a brief description that provides historical context • 28 short biographies of black aviation and military pioneers, important people among the Tuskegee Airmen, as well as several of the Airmen themselves • A comprehensive bibliographic description of major secondary works on the Tuskegee Airmen, World War II, airpower, and black participation in the American military • A glossary of specialized terms pertaining to the military, aviation, World War II, and African Americans
Tuskegee Airmen
Author:
Publisher: Pelican Publishing
ISBN: 1455613401
Pages:
Year:
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The Tuskegee Airmen Chronology
Author: Daniel Haulman
Publisher:
ISBN: 1588383415
Pages: 198
Year: 2018
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"[P]rovides a unique year-by-year overview of the fascinating story of the Tuskegee Airmen, embracing important events in the formation of the first military training for black pilots in United States history, the phases of their training at various air fields in Tuskegee and elsewhere, their continued training at other bases around the U. S., and their deployment overseas, first to North Africa and then to Sicily and Italy." --Provided by publisher.
The Employment of Negro Troops
Author: Ulysses Lee
Publisher: Government Printing Office
ISBN: 0160882648
Pages: 740
Year: 1966
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The Columbia Guide to African American History Since 1939
Author: Robert L Harris Jr., Rosalyn Terborg-Penn
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 023151087X
Pages: 456
Year: 2006-06-27
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This book is a multifaceted approach to understanding the central developments in African American history since 1939. It combines a historical overview of key personalities and movements with essays by leading scholars on specific facets of the African American experience, a chronology of events, and a guide to further study. Marian Anderson's famous 1939 concert in front of the Lincoln Memorial was a watershed moment in the struggle for racial justice. Beginning with this event, the editors chart the historical efforts of African Americans to address racism and inequality. They explore the rise of the Civil Rights and Black Power movements and the national and international contexts that shaped their ideologies and methods; consider how changes in immigration patterns have complicated the conventional "black/white" dichotomy in U.S. society; discuss the often uneasy coexistence between a growing African American middle class and a persistent and sizable underclass; and address the complexity of the contemporary African American experience. Contributors consider specific issues in African American life, including the effects of the postindustrial economy and the influence of music, military service, sports, literature, culture, business, and the politics of self-designation, e.g.,"Colored" vs. "Negro," "Black" vs. "African American". While emphasizing political and social developments, this volume also illuminates important economic, military, and cultural themes. An invaluable resource, The Columbia Guide to African American History Since 1939 provides a thorough understanding of a crucial historical period.
Bitter Fruit
Author: Maureen Honey
Publisher: University of Missouri Press
ISBN: 0826260799
Pages: 424
Year: 1999-01-01
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Despite the participation of African American women in all aspects of home-front activity during World War II, advertisements, recruitment posters, and newsreels portrayed largely white women as army nurses, defense plant workers, concerned mothers, and steadfast wives. This sea of white faces left for posterity images such as Rosie the Riveter, obscuring the contributions that African American women made to the war effort. In Bitter Fruit, Maureen Honey corrects this distorted picture of women's roles in World War II by collecting photos, essays, fiction, and poetry by and about black women from the four leading African American periodicals of the war period: Negro Digest, The Crisis, Opportunity, and Negro Story. Mostly appearing for the first time since their original publication, the materials in Bitter Fruit feature black women operating technical machinery, working in army uniforms, entertaining audiences, and pursuing a college education. The articles praise the women's accomplishments as pioneers working toward racial equality; the fiction and poetry depict female characters in roles other than domestic servants and give voice to the bitterness arising from discrimination that many women felt. With these various images, Honey masterfully presents the roots of the postwar civil rights movement and the leading roles black women played in it. Containing works from eighty writers, this anthology includes forty African American women authors, most of whose work has not been published since the war. Of particular note are poems and short stories anthologized for the first time, including Ann Petry's first story, Octavia Wynbush's last work of fiction, and three poems by Harlem Renaissance writer Georgia Douglas Johnson. Uniting these various writers was their desire to write in the midst of a worldwide military conflict with dramatic potential for ending segregation and opening doors for women at home. Traditional anthologies of African American literature jump from the Harlem Renaissance to the 1960s with little or no reference to the decades between those periods. Bitter Fruit not only illuminates the literature of these decades but also presents an image of black women as community activists that undercuts gender stereotypes of the era. As Honey concludes in her introduction, "African American women found an empowered voice during the war, one that anticipates the fruit of their wartime effort to break silence, to challenge limits, and to change forever the terms of their lives."