Empire Express Building The First Transcontinental Railroad.php Book PDF, EPUB Download & Read Online Free

Empire Express
Author: David Haward Bain
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1101658045
Pages: 816
Year: 2000-09-01
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After the Civil War, the building of the transcontinental railroad was the nineteenth century's most transformative event. Beginning in 1842 with a visionary's dream to span the continent with twin bands of iron, Empire Express captures three dramatic decades in which the United States effectively doubled in size, fought three wars, and began to discover a new national identity. From self--made entrepreneurs such as the Union Pacific's Thomas Durant and era--defining figures such as President Lincoln to the thousands of laborers whose backbreaking work made the railroad possible, this extraordinary narrative summons an astonishing array of voices to give new dimension not only to this epic endeavor but also to the culture, political struggles, and social conflicts of an unforgettable period in American history.
Nothing Like It In the World
Author: Stephen E. Ambrose
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 0743210832
Pages: 432
Year: 2000-08-29
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In this account of an unprecedented feat of engineering, vision, and courage, Stephen E. Ambrose offers a historical successor to his universally acclaimed Undaunted Courage, which recounted the explorations of the West by Lewis and Clark. Nothing Like It in the World is the story of the men who built the transcontinental railroad -- the investors who risked their businesses and money; the enlightened politicians who understood its importance; the engineers and surveyors who risked, and lost, their lives; and the Irish and Chinese immigrants, the defeated Confederate soldiers, and the other laborers who did the backbreaking and dangerous work on the tracks. The Union had won the Civil War and slavery had been abolished, but Abraham Lincoln, who was an early and constant champion of railroads, would not live to see the great achievement. In Ambrose's hands, this enterprise, with its huge expenditure of brainpower, muscle, and sweat, comes to life. The U.S. government pitted two companies -- the Union Pacific and the Central Pacific Railroads -- against each other in a race for funding, encouraging speed over caution. Locomo-tives, rails, and spikes were shipped from the East through Panama or around South America to the West or lugged across the country to the Plains. This was the last great building project to be done mostly by hand: excavating dirt, cutting through ridges, filling gorges, blasting tunnels through mountains. At its peak, the workforce -- primarily Chinese on the Central Pacific, Irish on the Union Pacific -- approached the size of Civil War armies, with as many as fifteen thousand workers on each line. The Union Pacific was led by Thomas "Doc" Durant, Oakes Ames, and Oliver Ames, with Grenville Dodge -- America's greatest railroad builder -- as chief engineer. The Central Pacific was led by California's "Big Four": Leland Stanford, Collis Huntington, Charles Crocker, and Mark Hopkins. The surveyors, the men who picked the route, were latter-day Lewis and Clark types who led the way through the wilderness, living off buffalo, deer, elk, and antelope. In building a railroad, there is only one decisive spot -- the end of the track. Nothing like this great work had been seen in the world when the last spike, a golden one, was driven in at Promontory Summit, Utah, in 1869, as the Central Pacific and the Union Pacific tracks were joined. Ambrose writes with power and eloquence about the brave men -- the famous and the unheralded, ordinary men doing the extraordinary -- who accomplished the spectacular feat that made the continent into a nation.
Rival Rails
Author: Walter R. Borneman
Publisher: Random House Incorporated
ISBN: 1400065615
Pages: 406
Year: 2010
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From wagon ruts to railroad empire, the author of Polk writes an expansive account of the battle to control the heavily contested transportation corridors of the American Southwest and to build America's greatest transcontinental route, in a book that includes archival photos and 30 maps.
The Transcontinental Railroad
Author: Budd Bailey
Publisher: Cavendish Square Publishing, LLC
ISBN: 150262642X
Pages: 64
Year: 2017-07-15
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People today refer to the Midwestern and prairie states as flyover country. During the Civil War, crossing those areas was the biggest obstacle in uniting the East and West Coasts of our divided nation. An act of Congress in 1862 authorized the Central Pacific and the Union Pacific railroad companies to build a railroad that would link the coasts. Seven years later, on May 10, 1869, an overwhelmingly immigrant labor force completed the task when a rail line was join in Promontory, Utah. The states had become united at last.
The Golden Spike
Author: Don Nardo
Publisher: Capstone
ISBN: 0756552702
Pages: 64
Year: 2015-02-01
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In the mid-1860s, as the Union Pacific Railroad headed westward from Nebraska, another company, the Central Pacific, pushed eastward from California. Their goal was to meet somewhere in between, forming a single railway line that would bridge the continent. That historic meeting took place in May 1869 in northern Utah, and photographer Andrew J. Russell was there to document the historic event. His work resulted in one of the most important photos of the 19th century and probably the most famous railroad image of all time. The photo, often called ñEast and West,î was viewed by a worldwide audience and affirmed that railroads were at the cutting edge of transportation technology. The continent was now linked.
American Indian History Day by Day
Author: Roger M. Carpenter
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 0313382220
Pages: 429
Year: 2012
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This unique, day-by-day compilation of important events helps students understand and appreciate five centuries of Native American history. * A chronology provides an at-a-glance overview of 500 years of Native American history * A bibliography that guides students and other researchers to print and online resources for further information
Engines of Change
Author: Ian J. Kerr
Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group
ISBN: 0275985644
Pages: 210
Year: 2007
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The former Jewel in the Crown of the British Empire, India remains by any measure a major economic and political actor on the world scene. Kerr recounts the importance of this extensive railway network--completed against all odds by her British colonial masters--to the diverse lands and peoples of the subcontinent. Railway networks brought them together as a colony and fostered the nationalism that would be Britain's downfall. Common rail travel enabled Gandhi to reach the masses. From its romantic mystique to its dangerous reality, it is India's rail travel that keeps vital social, cultural, economic and political forces moving today.
Post-Imperium
Author: Dmitri V. Trenin
Publisher: Brookings Institution Press
ISBN: 087003345X
Pages: 279
Year: 2011-08-01
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The war in Georgia. Tensions with Ukraine and other nearby countries. Moscow's bid to consolidate its "zone of privileged interests" among the Commonwealth of Independent States. These volatile situations all raise questions about the nature of and prospects for Russia's relations with its neighbors. In this book, Carnegie scholar Dmitri Trenin argues that Moscow needs to drop the notion of creating an exclusive power center out of the post-Soviet space. Like other former European empires, Russia will need to reinvent itself as a global player and as part of a wider community. Trenin's vision of Russia is an open Euro-Pacific country that is savvy in its use of soft power and fully reconciled with its former borderlands and dependents. He acknowledges that this scenario may sound too optimistic but warns that the alternative is not a new version of the historic empire but instead is the ultimate marginalization of Russia.
Out of the Night
Author: Jan Valtin
Publisher: AK Press
ISBN: 1902593863
Pages: 672
Year: 1941
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A gripping memior of political intrigue in Germany between the wars.
The GrandLuxe Express
Author: Karl Zimmermann
Publisher: Indiana University Press
ISBN: 0253349478
Pages: 143
Year: 2007
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This lavish book invites readers aboard the glamorous renovated cars of the GrandLuxe railway train. In 1989, the American-European Express, a stylish train created in emulation of Europe's Orient Express, commenced operation between Washington and Chicago. Forced to close down two years later, it was reborn in 1994 as the American Orient Express. The AOE, as this luxury streamliner was often known, matured under the tutelage of various owners until 2006, when under new ownership it acquired a new name, the GrandLuxe Express.Trackside, the train gleamed as a classic American streamliner. Aboard, travelers enjoy old-fashioned, wood-paneled elegance that harkens back to the 1920s and Europe's posh Wagons-Lits sleepers and restaurant cars.
Have His Carcase
Author: Dorothy L. Sayers
Publisher: Open Road Media
ISBN: 1453258914
Pages: 440
Year: 2012-07-31
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When Harriet Vane finds a dead body on the beach, she and Lord Peter Wimsey must solve a murder when all the evidence has washed out to sea. Harriet Vane has gone on vacation to forget her recent murder trial and, more importantly, to forget the man who cleared her name—the dapper, handsome, and maddening Lord Peter Wimsey. She is alone on a beach when she spies a man lying on a rock, surf lapping at his ankles. She tries to wake him, but he doesn’t budge. His throat has been cut, and his blood has drained out onto the sand. As the tide inches forward, Harriet makes what observations she can and photographs the scene. Finally, she goes for the police, but by the time they return the body has gone. Only one person can help her discover how the poor man died at the beach: Lord Peter, the amateur sleuth who won her freedom and her heart in one fell swoop. Have His Carcase is the 8th book in the Lord Peter Wimsey Mysteries, but you may enjoy the series by reading the books in any order. This ebook features an illustrated biography of Dorothy L. Sayers including rare images from the Marion E. Wade Center at Wheaton College.
Capitalism's Achilles Heel
Author: Raymond W. Baker
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 0471748587
Pages: 288
Year: 2005-08-05
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For over forty years in more than sixty countries, Raymond Baker has witnessed the free-market system operating illicitly and corruptly, with devastating consequences. In Capitalism’s Achilles Heel, Baker takes readers on a fascinating journey through the global free-market system and reveals how dirty money, poverty, and inequality are inextricably intertwined. Readers will discover how small illicit transactions lead to massive illegalities and how staggering global income disparities are worsened by the illegalities that permeate international capitalism. Drawing on his experiences, Baker shows how Western banks and businesses use secret transactions and ignore laws while handling some $1 trillion in illicit proceeds each year. He also illustrates how businesspeople, criminals, and kleptocrats perfect the same techniques to shift funds and how these tactics negatively affect individuals, institutions, and countries.
Sitting in Darkness
Author: David Haward Bain
Publisher: BookBaby
ISBN: 1624884598
Pages: 454
Year: 1984-11-03
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Sitting in Darkness follows the paths of three people in the Philippines: an American soldier of fortune, a Filipino revolutionary leader, and an American historian who left the safety and limits of the library for the hazards of the jungle. What emerges is a narrative in which past and present are unforgettably entwined. In March 1982, David Haward Bain hiked 110 miles through the mountainous, sparsely populated coast of Luzon. Led by pygmy guides, he and his five companions crossed peaks, forded rivers, and negotiated jungles to retrace a historic expedition made during a pivotal but now forgotten American war. What spurred Bain to attempt this trek were the personal sagas of two men who were symbols of their country's aspirations, headline makers at the century's turn, who are now largely unknown: Frederick Funston, a midwestern soldier of fortune and winner of the Congressional Medal of Honor, and Emilio Aguinaldo, the heart and soul of the Philippine insurrection against the United States. While in the Philippines, Bain spoke with moderate oppositionists, government supporters, and communist guerrillas; priests, social workers, political scientists, and historians; policemen and peasants. Their voices give considerable insight into the tinderbox of repression and revolution that smolders in the Philippines today. An epilogue brings the history of Philippine-American relations up to date with a meditation on the assassination of Benigno Aquino, a return during the People Power revolution, and what they mean for the future of Philippine and U.S. power in that part of the world. Sitting in Darkness is more than a history, although it is that many times over. It is that rare book in which yesterday and today are brought into sharp and simultaneous focus. It is a vast and meticulously executed chronicle of two nations and their people inextricably linked by politics and power, history and blood.
The Iron Road
Author: Christian Wolmar
Publisher: Dorling Kindersley Ltd
ISBN: 0241182689
Pages: 400
Year: 2014-05-01
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A fascinating journey through the history of railways From the early steam trains to the high-speed bullet trains of today, The Iron Road tells the hidden stories of railway history- the inspired engineering, blood, sweat and tears that went into the construction of the railways. Uncover the compelling tales of bold vision, invention and error, and social change behind the history of trains and railways, with famous railways such as the Transsiberian fully explored. Learn how the great railway pioneers such as George Stephenson produced the ideas and feats of engineering that created the railways and changed the world. Each exciting moment of railway history is captured, contextualised and enhanced by superb illustrations. Trains and railways of the past like the romantic Orient Express are brought to life through amazing eyewitness accounts, allowing you to see the railways through the eyes of people who were there at the time. Written by Christian Wolmar, an award-winning writer and broadcaster, The Iron Road is an exciting trip through the history of trains for any railway enthusiast.
A Life Wild and Perilous
Author: Robert M. Utley
Publisher: Holt Paperbacks
ISBN: 1627798838
Pages: 400
Year: 2015-09-15
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Early in the nineteenth century, the mountain men emerged as a small but distinctive group whose knowledge and experience of the trans-Mississippi West extended the national consciousness to continental dimensions. Though Lewis and Clark blazed a narrow corridor of geographical reality, the West remained largely terra incognita until trappers and traders--Jim Bridger, Kit Carson, Tom Fitzpatrick, Jedediah Smith--opened paths through the snow-choked mountain wilderness. They opened the way west to Fremont and played a major role in the pivotal years of 1845-1848 when Texas was annexed, the Oregon question was decided, and the Mexican War ended with the Southwest and California in American hands, the Pacific Ocean becoming our western boundary.