Montessori Perche No Una Pedagogia Per La Crescita Fuori Collana Book PDF, EPUB Download & Read Online Free

Maria Montessori
Author: Rita Kramer
Publisher: Diversion Books
ISBN: 1635761093
Pages: 410
Year: 2017-05-23
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"Highly recommended for educators, parents, and moderate feminists who seek inspiration from one of the most accomplished women of this or any other age."—Publishers Weekly The definitive biography of Maria Montessori—physician, feminist, social reformer, educator, and one of the most admired, influential, and controversial women of the twentieth century. Maria Montessori effected a worldwide revolution in the classroom. She developed a new method of educating the young and inspired a movement that carried it into every corner of the world. This is the story of the woman behind the public figure—her accomplishments, her ideas, and her passions. Montessori broke the mold imposed on women in the nineteenth century and forged a new one, first for herself and eventually for those who came after her. Against formidable odds she became the first woman to graduate from the medical school of the University of Rome and then devoted herself to the condition of children considered uneducable at the time. She developed a teaching method that enabled them to do as well as normal children, a method which then led her to found a new kind of school—the Casa dei Bambini, or House of Children—which gained her worldwide fame and still pervades classrooms wherever young children learn. This biography is not only the story of a groundbreaking feminist but a vital chapter in the history of education.
Montessori
Author: Grazia Honegger Fresco
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages: 421
Year: 2000
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To Educate the Human Potential
Author: Maria Montessori
Publisher: Ravenio Books
ISBN:
Pages:
Year: 2015-10-12
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This book is intended to follow Education for a New World and to help teachers to envisage the child’s needs after the age of six. We claim that the average boy or girl of twelve years who has been educated till then at one of our schools knows at least as much as the finished High School product of several years’ seniority, and the achievement has been at no cost of pain or distortion to body or mind. Rather are our pupils equipped in their whole being for the adventure of life, accustomed to the free exercise of will and judgment, illuminated by imagination and enthusiasm. Only such pupils can exercise rightly the duties of citizens in a civilised commonwealth. The first four chapters are mainly psychological, showing the changed personality with which the teacher has to deal at six years of age, and the need for a corresponding change of approach. The secret of success is found to lie in the right use of imagination in awakening interest, and the stimulation of seeds of interest already sown by attractive literary and pictorial material, but all correlated to a central idea, of greatly ennobling inspiration—the Cosmic Plan, in which all, consciously or unconsciously, serve the great Purpose of Life. It is shown how the conception of evolution has been modified of late through geological and biological discoveries, so that self-perfection now has to yield precedence to service among the primary natural urges. The next eight chapters show how the Cosmic Plan can be presented to the child, as a thrilling tale of the earth we live in, its many changes through slow ages when water was Nature’s chief toiler for accomplishment of her purposes, how land and sea fought for supremacy, and how equilibrium of elements was achieved, that Life might appear on the stage to play its part in the great drama. Illustrated as it must be by fascinating, charts and diagrams, the creation of earth as we now know it unfolds before the child’s imagination, and always with emphasis on the function each agent has to perform in Nature’s household, whether consciously or unconsciously, failure in this alone leading to extinction. So the talc proceeds till Palaeolithic Man appears, most significantly traced by the tools he used on his environment rather than by physical remains of so slight a creature. The new element of mind is brought to creation by man, and from that time the children are helped to see the great acceleration that has taken place in evolution. They learn to reverence the earliest pioneers, who toiled for purposes unknown to them but now to be recognised. Nomadic men and settlers alike contributed to build up early communities, and by interchanges of war and peace to share and spread social amenities. From chapter thirteen brief descriptions are given of some of the earliest civilizations, particularly with a view to their impacts on each other, showing human society as slowly organising itself towards unity, just as, in the individual human being, organs are built around separate centres of interest, to be later connected by the blood-circulatory system and the nerves, into an integrated human organism. So the child is led, by review of some of the most thrilling epochs of world-history, to see that so far humanity has been in an embryonic stage, and that it is just now emerging into true birth, able to consciously realise its true unity and function. The last chapters go back to the psychological point of view, urging on educators the supreme importance, to the nation and to the world, of the tasks imposed on them. Not in the service of any political or social creed should the teacher work, but in the service of the complete human being, able to exercise in freedom a self-disciplined will and judgment, unperverted by prejudice and undistorted by fear.
Pedagogical Anthropology
Author: Maria Montessori
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages: 508
Year: 1913
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Index for Inclusion
Author: Tony Booth, Mel Ainscow
Publisher:
ISBN: 1872001688
Pages: 190
Year: 2011
View: 463
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The Mass Explained to Children
Author: Maria Montessori
Publisher:
ISBN: 1684221714
Pages: 130
Year: 2017-11-17
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2017 Reprint of 1933 Edition. Full facsimile of the original edition, not reproduced with Optical Recognition software. Every conceivable element of the traditional Latin Mass unfolds before the eyes of children 8 to 15 in this classic work by Maria Montessori. She employs abundant illustrations--36 in all-- to explain: - The Meaning of the Mass - What Is Necessary for the Mass - Introduction to the Mass - The Mass of the Catechumens - The Mass of the Faithful These chapter headings hint at the richness of detail in the best book on the Mass ever written for older children: - Famous Eucharistic miracles - History of the Mass - Why we fast for Communion - Liturgical colors have meaning - Meaning of the altar...altar cloths...crucifix and candles - Sacred vessels, bells, incense--all the items used at Mass explained - Why we do more than watch when Mass is under way - Meaning/origin of: Sign of the Cross, sacrifice, the priest's whisperings - Meaning of key prayers (Credo, Kyrie, Gloria, Confiteor, etc.) - Why is so much silence required at Mass? - Explained: the priest's motions (e.g., keeping thumb and forefinger together after the consecration) "We want our children to love the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass. Love proceeds from knowledge: you can only love what you know. The Catechism teaches us that our purpose in life is to know, love and serve God. It is only if you know God, that you can love Him. In The Mass Explained to Children, Maria Montessori gives young readers the knowledge from which a love for the Mass can grow." --Laura Berquist, Homeschool Specialist
Education On The Dalton Plan
Author: Helen Parkhurst
Publisher: Read Books Ltd
ISBN: 1473387698
Pages: 320
Year: 2013-04-16
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Teaching and learning are correlative occupations which have been carried on since the beginnings of human society. In this book Miss Helen Parkhurst inquires how they may best be adjusted to one another, and offers a definite answer to the question.
Love Lessons
Author: Jacqueline Wilson
Publisher: Random House
ISBN: 1407045636
Pages: 272
Year: 2008-09-04
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Fourteen-year-old Prue and her sister Grace have been educated at home by their controlling, super-strict father all their lives. Forced to wear Mum's odd hand-made garments and forbidden from reading teenage magazines, they know they're very different to 'normal' girls - but when Dad has a stroke and ends up in hospital, unable to move or speak, Prue suddenly discovers what it's like to have a little freedom. Sent to a real school for the first time, Prue struggles to fit in. The only person she can talk to is her kindly, young - and handsome - art teacher, Rax. They quickly bond, and Prue feels more and more drawn to him. As her feelings grow stronger, she begins to realise that he might feel the same way about her. But nothing could ever happen between them - could it?
Dissolving Illusions
Author: Suzanne Humphries, Roman Bystrianyk
Publisher: CreateSpace
ISBN: 1480216895
Pages: 502
Year: 2013
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Starting in the mid-1800s, there was a steady drop in deaths from all infectious diseases, decreasing to relatively minor levels by the early 1900s. The history of that transformation involves famine, poverty, filth, lost cures, eugenicist doctrine, individual freedoms versus state might, protests and arrests over vaccine refusal, and much more. But the authors shows that vaccines, antibiotics, and other medical interventions are not responsible for the increase in lifespan and the decline in mortality from infectious diseases.
The Computer and the Child
Author: Peter G. Gebhardt-Seele
Publisher: Computer Science Press, Incorporated
ISBN:
Pages: 250
Year: 1985
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Man, Play, and Games
Author: Roger Caillois, Meyer Barash
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 025207033X
Pages: 208
Year: 1961
View: 1333
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Play is "an occasion of pure waste: waste of time, energy, ingenuity, skill, and often of money." It is also an essential element of human social and spiritual development. In this study, Roger Caillois defines play as a voluntary activity that occurs in a pure space, isolated and protected from the rest of life. Within limits set by rules that provide a level playing field, players move toward an unpredictable outcome by responding to their opponents' actions. Caillois qualifies types of games and ways of playing, from the improvisation characteristic of children's play to the disciplined pursuit of solutions to gratuitously difficult puzzles. He also examines the means by which games become part of daily life, ultimately giving cultures their most characteristic customs and institutions.
The Child in the Family
Author: Maria Montessori
Publisher:
ISBN: 1851091130
Pages: 75
Year: 1989
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Benvenuto fratellino, benvenuta sorellina. Favorire l'accoglienza del nuovo nato e la relazione tra fratelli
Author: Giorgia Cozza
Publisher:
ISBN: 8865800577
Pages: 240
Year: 2013
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Unconditional Parenting
Author: Alfie Kohn
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 0743487486
Pages: 264
Year: 2006-03-28
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The author of Punished by Rewards and The School Our Children Deserve builds on his parenting theories of working with children rather than trying to control them, argues against practices that teach children that they must earn a parent's approval, and presents techniques that promote desired child qualities through unconditional support. Reprint. 30,000 first printing.
Ecological Identity
Author: Mitchell Thomashow
Publisher: MIT Press
ISBN: 0262700638
Pages: 228
Year: 1996
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Mitchell Thomashow, a preeminent educator, shows how environmental studies can be taught from different perspective, one that is deeply informed by personal reflection. Through theoretical discussion as well as hands-on participatory learning approaches, Thomashow provides concerned citizens, teachers, and students with the tools needed to become reflective environmentalists.What do I know about the place where I live? Where do things come from? How do I connect to the earth? What is my purpose as a human being? These are the questions that Thomashow identifies as being at the heart of environmental education. Developing a profound sense of oneself in relationship to natural and social ecosystems is necessary grounding for the difficult work of environmental advocacy. In this book he provides a clear and accessible guide to the learning experiences that accompany the construction of an "ecological identity": using the direct experience of nature as a framework for personal decisions, professional choices, political action, and spiritual inquiry.Ecological Identity covers the different types of environmental thought and activism (using John Muir, Henry David Thoreau, and Rachel Carson as environmental archetypes, but branching out into ecofeminism and bioregionalism), issues of personal property and consumption, political identity and citizenship, and integrating ecological identity work into environmental studies programs. Each chapter has accompanying learning activities such as the Sense of Place Map, a Community Network Map, and the Political Genogram, most of which can be carried out on an individual basis.Although people from diverse backgrounds become environmental activists and enroll in environmental studies programs, they are rarely encouraged to examine their own history, motivations, and aspirations. Thomashow's approach is to reveal the depth of personal experience that underlies contemporary environmentalism and to explore, interpret, and nurture the learning spaces made possible when people are moved to contemplate their experience of nature.