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Restorative Justice, Self-interest Responsible Citizenship
Author: Lode Walgrave
Publisher: Willan
ISBN: 1134007639
Pages: 256
Year: 2013-05-13
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Lode Walgrave has made a highly significant contribution to the worldwide development of the restorative justice movement over the last two decades. This book represents the culmination of his vision for restorative justice.
Innovative Justice
Author: Hannah Graham, Rob White
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136216863
Pages: 170
Year: 2014-07-17
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This book showcases innovative justice initiatives from around the world which engage offenders, practitioners and communities to reduce reoffending and support desistance and positive change. It is groundbreaking in bringing together inspiring ideas and pioneering practices to analyse how ‘justice done differently’ is making a difference. The voices and experiences of the people at the forefront of these innovative initiatives are presented throughout the book, including offenders, corrections staff and directors, the judiciary, scientists and academics, volunteers and community organisations. Strengths-based research methods are used to investigate and celebrate best practices and ‘good news stories’ from the field. The authors raise critical questions about what is considered innovative and effective, for whom and in what context, presenting their own conceptual approach for analysing innovation. With initiatives drawn from diverse jurisdictions and cultures – including the UK, Europe, Australia, Asia, the US and South America – this book showcases original ideas and refreshing developments that have the potential to transform rehabilitation and reintegration practices. The book’s substance and style will resonate with practitioners, students and academics across the interdisciplinary fields of criminology and criminal justice.
Restorative Juvenile Justice
Author: L. Walgrave, S. Gordon Bazemore
Publisher:
ISBN: 1881798135
Pages: 399
Year: 1999
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Authors from Australia (John Braithwaite, Christine Parker), Europe (Lode Walgrave, Klaus Sessar, ElmarWeitekamp) and North America (Gordon Bazemore, Ray Corrado, Barry Feld, Curt Taylor Griffiths, Susan Guarino-Ghezzi, Russ Immarigeon, Andrew Klein, Maria Schiff, Mark Umbreit, Daniel van Ness) discuss juvenile justice and the response the youth crime.
Retributivism Has a Past
Author: Michael Tonry
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199798400
Pages: 288
Year: 2011-09-01
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For nearly two centuries in the United States, the punishment of crime was largely aimed, in theory and in practice, at prevention, rehabilitation or incapacitation, and deterrence. In the mid-1970s, a sharp-and some argued permanent-shift occurred. Punishment in the criminal justice system became first and foremost about retribution. Retribution trumped rehabilitation; proportionality outweighed prevention. The retributivist sea change was short-lived, however. After a few decades, some policy makers returned tentatively to individualized approaches to punishment, launching initiatives like drug courts and programs for treatment and reentry. Others promoted policies that retained the rhetoric but betrayed the theory-punishment in proportion to culpability-of retributivism, resulting in mandatory minimum sentences, three-strikes-and-you're-out laws, "dangerous offender" and "sexual predator" laws, "truth in sentencing," and life without the possibility of parole. What now for retributivism? Retributivism Has a Past: Has It a Future? brings thoughtfulness and rigor back into the retributivism debate. This collection of essays trains some of the most influential and brightest established and up-and-coming legal and philosophical minds on how retributivism does, might, or should affect contemporary policy and practices. The volume's aim is neither to condemn nor to justify, but to take new policies and practices seriously and examine them closely. At a time when criminal-justice policy makers are forced to reconsider contemporary approaches to punishment and attempt to devise new ones, Retributivism Has a Past: Has It a Future? offers serious theoretical critiques of the recent past and justifications for possible futures.
The Psychology of Restorative Justice
Author: Theo Gavrielides
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317018664
Pages: 296
Year: 2016-02-24
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This ground-breaking collection dares to take the next step in the advancement of an autonomous, inter-disciplinary restorative justice field of study. It brings together criminology, social psychology, legal theory, neuroscience, affect-script psychology, sociology, forensic mental health, political sciences, psychology and positive psychology to articulate for the first time a psychological concept of restorative justice. To this end, the book studies the power structures of the restorative justice movement, the very psychology, motivations and emotions of the practitioners who implement it as well as the drivers of its theoreticians and researchers. Furthermore, it examines the strengths and weakness of our own societies and the communities that are called to participate as parties in restorative justice. Their own biases, hunger for power and control, fears and hopes are investigated. The psychology and dynamics between those it aims to reach as well as those who are funding it, including policy makers and politicians, are looked into. All these questions lead to creating an understanding of the psychology of restorative justice. The book is essential reading for academics, researchers, policymakers, practitioners and campaigners.
Restorative Justice and the Law
Author: Lode Walgrave
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135999023
Pages: 256
Year: 2012-12-06
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Restorative justice has developed rapidly from being a barely known term to occupying a central role in debates on the future of criminal justice. But as it has become part of the mainstream of debate, so new tensions and issues have emerged. One of the most crucial issues is to find an appropriate combination of restorative justice, based essentially on informal deliberation, and the law. The purpose of this book is to analyse the several dimensions to this issue. It explores the social and ethical foundations of restorative justice, seeks to position it in relation to both rehabilitation and punishment, and examines the possibility of developing and incorporating restorative justice as the mainstream response to crime in terms of the principles of constitutional democracy. Amongst the questions it addresses are the following: How are informal processes to be juxtaposed with formal procedures? What is the appropriate relationship between voluntarism and coercion? How can the procedures and practices of restorative justice be combined with legal standards, safeguards and precepts? How can one balance restorative responses with legally sanctioned punishment? In this book a distinguished team of contributors consider this crucial set of relationships between restorative justice and the law, building upon papers and discussions at the fifth international restorative justice conference in Leuven, Belgium, in September 2001. restorative justice has grown rapidly throughout the worldthis book addresses the central issue of relationship of restorative justice to existing law and legal systemschapters from world leading authorities
Rebuilding Native Nations
Author: Miriam Jorgensen
Publisher: University of Arizona Press
ISBN: 0816524238
Pages: 363
Year: 2007
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A revolution is underway among the Indigenous nations of North America. It is a quiet revolution, largely unnoticed in society at large. But it is profoundly important. From High Plains states and Prairie Provinces to southwestern deserts, from Mississippi and Oklahoma to the northwest coast of the continent, Native peoples are reclaiming their right to govern themselves and to shape their future in their own ways. Challenging more than a century of colonial controls, they are addressing severe social problems, building sustainable economies, and reinvigorating Indigenous cultures. In effect, they are rebuilding their nations according to their own diverse and often innovative designs. Produced by the Native Nations Institute for Leadership, Management, and Policy at the University of Arizona and the Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development, this book traces the contours of that revolution as Native nations turn the dream of self-determination into a practical reality. Part report, part analysis, part how-to manual for Native leaders, it discusses strategies for governance and community and economic development being employed by American Indian nations and First Nations in Canada as they move to assert greater control over their own affairs. Rebuilding Native Nations provides guidelines for creating new governance structures, rewriting constitutions, building justice systems, launching nation-owned enterprises, encouraging citizen entrepreneurs, developing new relationships with non-Native governments, and confronting the crippling legacies of colonialism. For nations that wish to join that revolution or for those who simply want to understand the transformation now underway across Indigenous North America, this book is a critical resource. CONTENTS Foreword by Oren Lyons Editor's Introduction Part 1 Starting Points 1. Two Approaches to the Development of Native Nations: One Works, the Other Doesn't Stephen Cornell and Joseph P. Kalt 2. Development, Governance, Culture: What Are They and What Do They Have to Do with Rebuilding Native Nations? Manley A. Begay, Jr., Stephen Cornell, Miriam Jorgensen, and Joseph P. Kalt Part 2 Rebuilding the Foundations 3. Remaking the Tools of Governance: Colonial Legacies, Indigenous Solutions Stephen Cornell 4. The Role of Constitutions in Native Nation Building: Laying a Firm Foundation Joseph P. Kalt 5 . Native Nation Courts: Key Players in Nation Rebuilding Joseph Thomas Flies-Away, Carrie Garrow, and Miriam Jorgensen 6. Getting Things Done for the Nation: The Challenge of Tribal Administration Stephen Cornell and Miriam Jorgensen Part 3 Reconceiving Key Functions 7. Managing the Boundary between Business and Politics: Strategies for Improving the Chances for Success in Tribally Owned Enterprises Kenneth Grant and Jonathan Taylor 8. Citizen Entrepreneurship: An Underutilized Development Resource Stephen Cornell, Miriam Jorgensen, Ian Wilson Record, and Joan Timeche 9. Governmental Services and Programs: Meeting Citizens' Needs Alyce S. Adams, Andrew J. Lee, and Michael Lipsky 10. Intergovernmental Relationships: Expressions of Tribal Sovereignty Sarah L. Hicks Part 4 Making It Happen 11. Rebuilding Native Nations: What Do Leaders Do? Manley A. Begay, Jr., Stephen Cornell, Miriam Jorgensen, and Nathan Pryor 12. Seizing the Future: Why Some Native Nations Do and Others Don't Stephen Cornell, Miriam Jorgensen, Joseph P. Kalt, and Katherine Spilde Contreras Afterword by Satsan (Herb George) References About the Contributors Index
Contested Justice
Author: Christian De Vos, Sara Kendall, Carsten Stahn
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1316483266
Pages:
Year: 2015-12-18
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The International Criminal Court emerged in the early twenty-first century as an ambitious and permanent institution with a mandate to address mass atrocity crimes such as genocide and crimes against humanity. Although designed to exercise jurisdiction only in instances where states do not pursue these crimes themselves (and are unwilling or unable to do so), the Court's interventions, particularly in African states, have raised questions about the social value of its work and its political dimensions and effects. Bringing together scholars and practitioners who specialise on the ICC, this collection offers a diverse account of its interventions: from investigations to trials and from the Court's Hague-based centre to the networks of actors who sustain its activities. Exploring connections with transitional justice and international relations, and drawing upon critical insights from the interpretive social sciences, it offers a novel perspective on the ICC's work. This title is also available as Open Access.
Restorative Justice for Juveniles
Author: Lode Walgrave
Publisher: Leuven University Press
ISBN: 906186920X
Pages: 407
Year: 1998-01-01
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A selection of papers presented at the international conference, Leuven, May 12-14, 1997.
Offenders No More
Author: Theo Gavrielides
Publisher:
ISBN: 1634836812
Pages: 419
Year: 2015-12-01
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Offender rehabilitation theory and practice have traditionally focused on curing "offenders" of their deviant tendencies by changing their habits, opportunities, personality and outlook on life. Consequently, a number of interventions have been developed within the criminal justice system that are said to be involved in helping offenders. Success is measured by recidivism rates. To this end, rehabilitation has become an important aim of sentencing, whether it be in the form of incarceration, community or monetary penalties. Recently, the foundations of rehabilitation theory and practice have been shaken. Rehabilitation is now seen by many as a threat to offenders' rights and humanitarian principles. Some have even argued that rehabilitation practices are harmful to offenders' chances of correction. Alongside these concerns, the entire paradigm on which our modern criminal justice systems are based has also been questioned. Alternative visions of justice have been moved out of the shadows in the hope that more effective processes are developed for safer and more just societies. One of these visions is encapsulated in restorative justice, which is based on the foundation of promoting human goods in the pursuit of restoration of harm and the correction of deviant behaviour. Restorative justice practices, such as mediation, circles and conferencing bring to the fore states of affairs, activities and experiences that are strongly associated with well-being and higher level of personal satisfaction and social functioning. They aim to create empathy and remorse, and through constructive and honest dialogue create a sense of responsibility in the "offender" and a feeling of empowerment and justice in the "victim". Within this framework, the labels of "victim" and "offender" collapse. A new approach to crime reduction and offender rehabilitation is thus needed. This ground-breaking, edited volume aims to respond to this call by bringing together inter-disciplinary thinking from criminology, affect-script psychology, sociology, political sciences and human rights, psychology and positive psychology, design and arts and social work. The inter-disciplinary dialogue that this book promotes aims to advance the restorative justice field, its tools, practices and evaluation techniques by bringing rehabilitation theory into the restorative justice debate, and vice versa.
Lines Drawn Upon the Water
Author: Karl S. Hele
Publisher: Wilfrid Laurier Univ. Press
ISBN: 1554580048
Pages: 351
Year: 2008-09-30
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Proceedings of a conference held at University of Western Ontario, London, Ont., Feb. 11-12, 2005.
When Prisoners Come Home
Author: Joan Petersilia
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199888949
Pages: 320
Year: 2009-04-21
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Every year, hundreds of thousands of jailed Americans leave prison and return to society. Largely uneducated, unskilled, often without family support, and with the stigma of a prison record hanging over them, many if not most will experience serious social and psychological problems after release. Fewer than one in three prisoners receive substance abuse or mental health treatment while incarcerated, and each year fewer and fewer participate in the dwindling number of vocational or educational pre-release programs, leaving many all but unemployable. Not surprisingly, the great majority is rearrested, most within six months of their release. What happens when all those sent down the river come back up--and out? As long as there have been prisons, society has struggled with how best to help prisoners reintegrate once released. But the current situation is unprecedented. As a result of the quadrupling of the American prison population in the last quarter century, the number of returning offenders dwarfs anything in America's history. What happens when a large percentage of inner-city men, mostly Black and Hispanic, are regularly extracted, imprisoned, and then returned a few years later in worse shape and with dimmer prospects than when they committed the crime resulting in their imprisonment? What toll does this constant "churning" exact on a community? And what do these trends portend for public safety? A crisis looms, and the criminal justice and social welfare system is wholly unprepared to confront it. Drawing on dozens of interviews with inmates, former prisoners, and prison officials, Joan Petersilia convincingly shows us how the current system is failing, and failing badly. Unwilling merely to sound the alarm, Petersilia explores the harsh realities of prisoner reentry and offers specific solutions to prepare inmates for release, reduce recidivism, and restore them to full citizenship, while never losing sight of the demands of public safety. As the number of ex-convicts in America continues to grow, their systemic marginalization threatens the very society their imprisonment was meant to protect. America spent the last decade debating who should go to prison and for how long. Now it's time to decide what to do when prisoners come home.
From Treaty Peoples to Treaty Nation
Author: Greg Poelzer, Ken S. Coates
Publisher: UBC Press
ISBN: 0774827564
Pages: 366
Year: 2015-07-28
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Canada is a country founded on relationships and agreements between Indigenous people and newcomers. Although recent court cases have strengthened Aboriginal rights, the cooperative spirit of the treaties is being lost as Canadians engage in endless arguments about First Nations “issues.” Greg Poelzer and Ken Coates breathe new life into these debates by looking at approaches that have failed and succeeded in the past and offering all Canadians – from policy makers to concerned citizens – realistic steps forward. The road ahead is clear: if all Canadians take up their responsibilities as treaty peoples, Canada will become a leader among treaty nations
Restorative Justice
Author: Heather Strang, John Braithwaite
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1351965301
Pages: 240
Year: 2017-09-19
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The astonishing development of restorative justice practice over the past decade has inspired creative new thinking about the philosophy of punishment and principles of justice. Many of the questions raised in this book – such as the relationship between restorative and retributive justice and the values and processes which should guide restorative practice – are the subject of intense debates. With contributions from many of the most distinguished scholars in the field, this book analyzes the gap between philosophy and practice and the need for practice to be more informed by philosophy. This volume is a milestone in the development of those underlying principles which will direct the progress of restorative justice in the future.
Restorative Justice
Author: Frank Früchtel, Anna-Maria Halibrand
Publisher: Springer-Verlag
ISBN: 3658101792
Pages: 132
Year: 2015-10-26
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Auf Untaten erfolgen Urteile, auf Grenzverletzungen Sanktionen, auf Fehlverhalten Strafen. Unser Strafrechtssystem ist ein rationaler Apparat, der in seiner eigenen Logik betrachtet ähnlich alternativlos erscheint wie die Strafsysteme vergangener Jahrhunderte. In diesem Lehrbuch werden Modelle des alternativen Umgangs mit verletzenden Verhalten diskutiert. Wiedergutmachung, Verständigung, Heilung und Gemeinschaft stehen dabei im Vordergrund - weniger die Strafe. Restorative Justice und indigenisierte Sozialarbeit sind neue Fachdiskurse im deutschen Sprachraum. Theoretische Darstellungen und praktische Beispiele schaffen einen Überblick zu den Methoden, die anwendungsbezogen aufbereitet wurden und dazu anregen, über Bestehendes und Mögliches nachzudenken.