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The Cerebellum
Author: Dianne M. Broussard
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1118730348
Pages: 240
Year: 2013-08-09
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The Cerebellum provides a concise, accessible overview of modern data on physiology and function of the cerebellum as it relates to learning, plasticity, and neurodegenerative diseases. Encompassing anatomy and physiology, theoretical work, cellular mechanisms, clinical research, and disorders, the book covers learning and plasticity while introducing the anatomy of the cerebellum. Known and proposed "functions of the cerebellum" are addressed on clinical, physiological, cellular, and computational levels, providing academics, researchers, medical students, and graduate students with an invaluable reference.
How People Learn
Author: National Research Council, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education, Board on Behavioral, Cognitive, and Sensory Sciences, Committee on Developments in the Science of Learning with additional material from the Committee on Learning Research and Educational Practice
Publisher: National Academies Press
ISBN: 0309131979
Pages: 384
Year: 2000-08-11
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First released in the Spring of 1999, How People Learn has been expanded to show how the theories and insights from the original book can translate into actions and practice, now making a real connection between classroom activities and learning behavior. This edition includes far-reaching suggestions for research that could increase the impact that classroom teaching has on actual learning. Like the original edition, this book offers exciting new research about the mind and the brain that provides answers to a number of compelling questions. When do infants begin to learn? How do experts learn and how is this different from non-experts? What can teachers and schools do-with curricula, classroom settings, and teaching methods--to help children learn most effectively? New evidence from many branches of science has significantly added to our understanding of what it means to know, from the neural processes that occur during learning to the influence of culture on what people see and absorb. How People Learn examines these findings and their implications for what we teach, how we teach it, and how we assess what our children learn. The book uses exemplary teaching to illustrate how approaches based on what we now know result in in-depth learning. This new knowledge calls into question concepts and practices firmly entrenched in our current education system. Topics include: How learning actually changes the physical structure of the brain. How existing knowledge affects what people notice and how they learn. What the thought processes of experts tell us about how to teach. The amazing learning potential of infants. The relationship of classroom learning and everyday settings of community and workplace. Learning needs and opportunities for teachers. A realistic look at the role of technology in education.
The Power of the Adolescent Brain
Author: Thomas Armstrong
Publisher: ASCD
ISBN: 1416621873
Pages: 202
Year: 2016-07-14
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Moody. Reckless. Impractical. Insecure. Distracted. These are all words commonly used to describe adolescents. But what if we recast these traits in a positive light? Teens possess insight, passion, idealism, sensitivity, and creativity in abundance--all qualities that can make a significant positive contribution to society. In this thought-provoking book, Thomas Armstrong looks at the power and promise of the teenage brain from an empathetic, strength-based perspective--and describes what middle and high school educators can do to make the most of their students' potential. Thoroughly grounded in current neuroscience research, the book explains what we know about how the adolescent brain works and proposes eight essential instructional elements that will help students develop the ability to think, make healthy choices, regulate their emotions, handle social conflict, consolidate their identities, and learn enough about the world to move into adulthood with dignity and grace. Armstrong provides practical strategies and real-life examples from schools that illustrate these eight key practices in action. In addition, you'll find a glossary of brain terms, a selection of brain-friendly lesson plans across the content areas, and a list of resources to support and extend the book's ideas and practices. There is a colossal mismatch between how the adolescent brain has evolved over the millennia and the passive, rote learning experiences that are all too common in today’s test-obsessed educational climate. See the amazing difference—in school and beyond—when you use the insights from this book to help students tap into the power of their changing brains.
The Brain-Targeted Teaching Model for 21st-Century Schools
Author: Mariale M. Hardiman
Publisher: Corwin Press
ISBN: 1412991986
Pages: 223
Year: 2012-02-15
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This proven model for applying brain research for more effective instruction shows how to implement educational and cognitive neuroscience principles to classroom settings through a pedagogical framework.
The Amazing Brain
Author: Robert E. Ornstein, Richard F. Thompson
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN: 0395585724
Pages: 182
Year: 1991-06-17
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A visual, informative, and comprehensible study of the construction, evolution, and chemical and electrical operation of the human brain
Discovering Psychology: The Science of Mind
Author: John Cacioppo, Laura Freberg
Publisher: Cengage Learning
ISBN: 1133707289
Pages: 944
Year: 2012-03-16
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In this fresh new offering to the Intro Psychology course, authors John Cacioppo and Laura Freberg portray psychology as being an integrative science in two ways. First, they have written a text that reflects psychology's rightful place as a hub science that draws from and is cited by research in many other fields. Second, this text presents psychology as a unified science that seeks a complete understanding of the human mind, rather than as a loosely organized set of autonomous subspecialties. As psychology moves rapidly toward maturity as an integrative, multidisciplinary field, the introductory course offers an opportunity to teach all of psychology in one place and at one time. This text reflects that evolution--and the authors' excitement about it. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.
Introduction to Language Development
Author: Shelia M. Kennison
Publisher: SAGE Publications
ISBN: 1483315320
Pages: 496
Year: 2013-07-18
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There are between 4,000 and 6,000 languages remaining in the world and the characteristics of these languages vary widely. How could an infant born today master any language in the world, regardless of the language’s characteristics? Shelia M. Kennison answers this question through a comprehensive introduction to language development, taking a unique perspective that spans the period before birth through old age. Introduction to Language Development offers in-depth discussions on key topics, including: the biological basis of language, perceptual development, grammatical development, development of lexical knowledge, social aspects of language, bilingualism, the effect of language on thought, cognitive processing in language production and comprehension, language-related delays and disorders, and language late in life.
Dyslexia and Physical Education
Author: Madeleine Portwood
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135372837
Pages: 120
Year: 2012-09-10
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Much research has focused on dyslexia and co-ordination. This book examines the literature and provides a framework to support pupils with dyslexia, not only during PE lessons but in less structured environments, for example during break time when pupils are likely to be involved in physical activities.
Darwin's Unfinished Symphony
Author: Kevin N. Laland
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 069118447X
Pages:
Year: 2018-09-11
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Humans possess an extraordinary capacity for culture, from the arts and language to science and technology. But how did the human mind—and the uniquely human ability to devise and transmit culture—evolve from its roots in animal behavior? Darwin’s Unfinished Symphony presents a captivating new theory of human cognitive evolution. This compelling and accessible book reveals how culture is not just the magnificent end product of an evolutionary process that produced a species unlike all others—it is also the key driving force behind that process. Kevin Laland tells the story of the painstaking fieldwork, the key experiments, the false leads, and the stunning scientific breakthroughs that led to this new understanding of how culture transformed human evolution. It is the story of how Darwin’s intellectual descendants picked up where he left off and took up the challenge of providing a scientific account of the evolution of the human mind.
Sound, Music and Movement in Parkinson’s Disease
Author: Marta M. N. Bieńkiewicz, Cathy Craig
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
ISBN: 2889450791
Pages:
Year: 2017-01-05
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Recent years have brought new insights to the understanding of Parkinson’s disease, impact of exercise and sound displays in rehabilitation and movement facilitation. There is growing evidence that auditory signals in the environment can provide a temporal template for movement and change the mode of motor control from intrinsic to extrinsic; habitual to goal-directed, enabling enhanced motor performance in patients. In addition, forced exercise rate studies show that exercising at the pace of healthy adults can have potential neuroprotective benefits for patients. Many research groups have explored the use of auditory cues (such as rhythmical auditory training) in improving gait and upper limb movement parameters. Cues are usually either intermittent (metronome) or continuous (dynamic sound displays). Similarly, dance based interventions suggest that patients benefit from additional sensory information (i.e. the temporal structure embedded in music and proprioceptive information from a dancing partner) that facilities movement. On the contrary, studies dedicated to auditory perception and motor timing report an impaired ability of patients to perceive and synchronise with complex rhythmical structures (i.e. causing an inability to play musical instruments). With the growth of modern technology and the increasing portability of hi-specification devices (such as smart phones), new research questions on the design of interventions are beginning to emerge as we strive for more efficient therapeutic approaches. In this Research Topic we wanted to bring together top scientists from the movement disorder, motor control and sound related studies along with therapists. That way, we can engage in cross-disciplinary and challenging scientific debate about future rehabilitation avenues and frontiers for Parkinson’s disease patients.
Enabling America:
Author: Committee on Assessing Rehabilitation Science and Engineering, Institute of Medicine
Publisher: National Academies Press
ISBN: 0309063744
Pages: 424
Year: 1997-11-24
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The most recent high-profile advocate for Americans with disabilities, actor Christopher Reeve, has highlighted for the public the economic and social costs of disability and the importance of rehabilitation. Enabling America is a major analysis of the field of rehabilitation science and engineering. The book explains how to achieve recognition for this evolving field of study, how to set priorities, and how to improve the organization and administration of the numerous federal research programs in this area. The committee introduces the "enabling-disability process" model, which enhances the concepts of disability and rehabilitation, and reviews what is known and what research priorities are emerging in the areas of: Pathology and impairment, including differences between children and adults. Functional limitations--in a person's ability to eat or walk, for example. Disability as the interaction between a person's pathologies, impairments, and functional limitations and the surrounding physical and social environments. This landmark volume will be of special interest to anyone involved in rehabilitation science and engineering: federal policymakers, rehabilitation practitioners and administrators, researchers, and advocates for persons with disabilities.
High-Functioning Individuals with Autism
Author: Eric Schopler, Gary B. Mesibov
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 1489924566
Pages: 316
Year: 2013-11-11
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Designed to advance understanding of the unique needs of high-functioning individuals with autism, this volume details the latest diagnostic and treatment approaches and analyzes the current conceptions of the neurological processes involved in autism.
Fundamentals of Developmental Psychology
Author: Peter Mitchell, Fenja Ziegler
Publisher: Psychology Press
ISBN: 1135007993
Pages: 320
Year: 2013-03-05
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This new edition of the highly successful Fundamentals of Development: The Psychology of Childhood has been thoroughly revised and updated to reflect the exciting new findings in the thriving area of developmental psychology. The book addresses a number of fascinating questions including:Are children born good or bad?What do children understand about the mind?What roles do nature and nurture play in child development?As in the previous edition, the book follows a thematic approach and outlines the main areas of developmental psychology.
Brain-Based Learning
Author: Eric Jensen
Publisher: Corwin Press
ISBN: 1452295247
Pages: 288
Year: 2008-06-12
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Adopt a teaching approach aligned with the brain's natural way of learning! An expert in brain research and brain-based teaching strategies, Eric Jensen offers an easy-to-understand explanation of the relationship between learning and the brain. Updated and streamlined, this second edition features in-depth information about the impact of physiological effects, sensory stimuli, and emotions on student learning and includes: A set of brain-based principles for informed decision making Low-cost teaching strategies that teachers can implement immediately Reader-friendly language accessible for both novice and veteran educators Easy-to-follow chapter outlines and helpful text boxes to emphasize key points
Online Education and Adult Learning: New Frontiers for Teaching Practices
Author: Kidd, Terry T.
Publisher: IGI Global
ISBN: 1605668311
Pages: 376
Year: 2009-08-31
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"This book disseminates current issues and trends emerging in the field of adult e-learning and online instruction"--Provided by publisher.