The Magical Maze Seeing The World Through Mathematical Eyes.php Book PDF, EPUB Download & Read Online Free

The Magical Maze
Author: Ian Stewart
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN:
Pages: 288
Year: 1999-08-23
View: 1274
Read: 1178
Approaches mathematics using an assortment of puzzles and problems and the metaphorical structure of a maze.
What is Mathematics, Really?
Author: Reuben Hersh
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0195130871
Pages: 343
Year: 1997
View: 164
Read: 615
Most philosophers of mathematics treat it as isolated, timeless, ahistorical, inhuman. Reuben Hersh argues the contrary, that mathematics must be understood as a human activity, a social phenomenon, part of human culture, historically evolved, and intelligible only in a social context. Hersh pulls the screen back to reveal mathematics as seen by professionals, debunking many mathematical myths, and demonstrating how the "humanist" idea of the nature of mathematics more closely resembles how mathematicians actually work. At the heart of his book is a fascinating historical account of the mainstream of philosophy--ranging from Pythagoras, Descartes, and Spinoza, to Bertrand Russell, David Hilbert, and Rudolph Carnap--followed by the mavericks who saw mathematics as a human artifact, including Aristotle, Locke, Hume, Mill, and Lakatos. What is Mathematics, Really? reflects an insider's view of mathematical life, and will be hotly debated by anyone with an interest in mathematics or the philosophy of science.
Math from Three to Seven
Author: Aleksandr Kalmanovich Zvonkin
Publisher: American Mathematical Soc.
ISBN: 082186873X
Pages: 300
Year: 2011
View: 883
Read: 407
This book is a captivating account of a professional mathematician's experiences conducting a math circle for preschoolers in his apartment in Moscow in the 1980s. As anyone who has taught or raised young children knows, mathematical education for little kids is a real mystery. What are they capable of? What should they learn first? How hard should they work? Should they even "work" at all? Should we push them, or just let them be? There are no correct answers to these questions, and the author deals with them in classic math-circle style: he doesn't ask and then answer a question, but shows us a problem--be it mathematical or pedagogical--and describes to us what happened. His book is a narrative about what he did, what he tried, what worked, what failed, but most important, what the kids experienced. This book does not purport to show you how to create precocious high achievers. It is just one person's story about things he tried with a half-dozen young children. Mathematicians, psychologists, educators, parents, and everybody interested in the intellectual development in young children will find this book to be an invaluable, inspiring resource. In the interest of fostering a greater awareness and appreciation of mathematics and its connections to other disciplines and everyday life, MSRI and the AMS are publishing books in the Mathematical Circles Library series as a service to young people, their parents and teachers, and the mathematics profession. Titles in this series are co-published with the Mathematical Sciences Research Institute (MSRI).
Professor Stewart's Cabinet of Mathematical Curiosities
Author: Ian Stewart
Publisher: Profile Books
ISBN: 1847651283
Pages: 320
Year: 2010-09-03
View: 920
Read: 648
School maths is not the interesting part. The real fun is elsewhere. Like a magpie, Ian Stewart has collected the most enlightening, entertaining and vexing 'curiosities' of maths over the years... Now, the private collection is displayed in his cabinet. There are some hidden gems of logic, geometry and probability -- like how to extract a cherry from a cocktail glass (harder than you think), a pop up dodecahedron, the real reason why you can't divide anything by zero and some tips for making money by proving the obvious. Scattered among these are keys to unlocking the mysteries of Fermat's last theorem, the Poincar Conjecture, chaos theory, and the P/NP problem for which a million dollar prize is on offer. There are beguiling secrets about familiar names like Pythagoras or prime numbers, as well as anecdotes about great mathematicians. Pull out the drawers of the Professor's cabinet and who knows what could happen...
The Universal Book of Mathematics
Author: David Darling
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 0471270474
Pages: 383
Year: 2004-08-11
View: 804
Read: 228
Reference book on mathematics.
Mathematics Learning in Early Childhood
Author: National Research Council, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education, Center for Education, Committee on Early Childhood Mathematics
Publisher: National Academies Press
ISBN: 0309147433
Pages: 398
Year: 2009-11-13
View: 760
Read: 812
Early childhood mathematics is vitally important for young children's present and future educational success. Research demonstrates that virtually all young children have the capability to learn and become competent in mathematics. Furthermore, young children enjoy their early informal experiences with mathematics. Unfortunately, many children's potential in mathematics is not fully realized, especially those children who are economically disadvantaged. This is due, in part, to a lack of opportunities to learn mathematics in early childhood settings or through everyday experiences in the home and in their communities. Improvements in early childhood mathematics education can provide young children with the foundation for school success. Relying on a comprehensive review of the research, Mathematics Learning in Early Childhood lays out the critical areas that should be the focus of young children's early mathematics education, explores the extent to which they are currently being incorporated in early childhood settings, and identifies the changes needed to improve the quality of mathematics experiences for young children. This book serves as a call to action to improve the state of early childhood mathematics. It will be especially useful for policy makers and practitioners-those who work directly with children and their families in shaping the policies that affect the education of young children.
Unfolding the Labyrinth: Open Problems in Physics, Mathematics, Astrophysics, and other areas of science
Author: Florentin Smarandache, V. Christianto
Publisher: Infinite Study
ISBN: 1599730138
Pages: 139
Year: 2006-01-01
View: 784
Read: 1160
Throughout this book, we discuss some open problems in various branches of science, including mathematics, theoretical physics, astrophysics, geophysics etc. It is of our hope that some of the problems discussed in this book will find their place either in theoretical exploration or further experiments, while some parts of these problems may be found useful for scholarly stimulation.The present book is also intended for young physics and mathematics fellows who will perhaps find the unsolved problems described here are at least worth pondering. If this book provides only a few highlights of plausible solutions, it is merely to keep the fun of readers in discovering the answers by themselves. Bon voyage!
Math You Can't Use
Author: Ben Klemens
Publisher: Brookings Institution Press
ISBN: 0815797958
Pages: 181
Year: 2005-11-28
View: 1279
Read: 787
This lively and innovative book is about computer code and the legal controls and restrictions on those who write it. The widespread use of personal computers and the Internet have made it possible to release new data or tools instantaneously to virtually the entire world. However, while the digital revolution allows quick and extensive use of these intellectual properties, it also means that their developers face new challenges in retaining their rights as creators. Drawing on a host of examples, Ben Klemens describes and analyzes the intellectual property issues involved in the development of computer software. He focuses on software patents because of their powerful effect on the software market, but he also provides an extensive discussion of how traditional copyright laws can be applied to code. The book concludes with a discussion of recommendations to ease the constraints on software development. This is the first book to confront these problems with serious policy solutions. It is sure to become the standard reference for software developers, those concerned with intellectual property issues, and for policymakers seeking direction. It is critical that public policy on these issues facilitates progress rather than hindering it. There is too much at stake.
The Thinking Fan's Guide to Walt Disney World
Author: Aaron Wallace
Publisher:
ISBN: 0998059234
Pages:
Year: 2017-01-31
View: 892
Read: 1018
Learn to Slow Down and Savor the World's Boldest Theme Park There's no place like Epcot. It's the theme park that endeavored to change the world. Now, more than 30 years later, Aaron Wallace dives deep into the heart of Epcot. Step beyond the typical rush-here, do-that frenzy of most guidebooks to truly appreciate the park's history, storytelling, and controversies. The Thinking Fan's Guide is a lighthearted but scholarly tour through every Epcot ride and show. You'll learn to unpack big questions like: - Should a Future World attraction ever take place in the past? - Are Frozen's Anna and Elsa holding World Showcase hostage? - Do Disney characters belong in Epcot? - Why does the park spend so much time in Ellen DeGeneres's head? - Has Epcot lost its way? - Did the park really change the world? This is a guide for those ready to immerse themselves in the wondrous achievement of 1982's EPCOT Center and the multi-faceted, modern-day Epcot it has become. Longtime Disney buffs will find new insights and surprising perspectives, while newcomers will get more out of their vacations by learning to look at Epcot as a work of art. Fall in Love with Epcot for the First Time... or All Over Again.
The Atrocity Archives
Author: Charles Stross
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1101208848
Pages: 368
Year: 2006-01-03
View: 586
Read: 271
The first novel in Hugo Award-winning author Charles Stross's witty Laundry Files series. Bob Howard is a low-level techie working for a super-secret government agency. While his colleagues are out saving the world, Bob's under a desk restoring lost data. His world was dull and safe - but then he went and got Noticed. Now, Bob is up to his neck in spycraft, parallel universes, dimension-hopping terrorists, monstrous elder gods and the end of the world. Only one thing is certain: it will take more than a full system reboot to sort this mess out . . .
The Lucifer Principle
Author: Howard Bloom
Publisher: Open Road + Grove/Atlantic
ISBN: 0802192181
Pages: 466
Year: 2013-11-01
View: 281
Read: 865
The Lucifer Priciple is a revolutionary work that explores the intricate relationships among genetics, human behavior, and culture to put forth the thesis that “evil” is a by-product of nature’s strategies for creation and that it is woven into our most basic biological fabric. In a sweeping narrative that moves lucidly among sophisticated scientific disciplines and covers the entire span of the earth’s, as well as mankind’s, history, Howard Bloom challenges some of our most popular scientific assumptions. Drawing on evidence from studies of the most primitive organisms to those on ants, apes, and humankind, the author makes a persuasive case that it is the group, or “superorganism,” rather than the lone individual that really matters in the evolutionary struggle. But, Bloom asserts, the prominence of society and culture does not necessarily mitigate against our most violent, aggressive instincts. In fact, under the right circumstances the mentality of the group will only amplify our most primitive and deadly urges. In Bloom’s most daring contention he draws an analogy between the biological material whose primordial multiplication began life on earth and the ideas, or “memes,” that define, give cohesion to, and justify human superorganisms. Some of the most familiar memes are utopian in nature—Christianity or Marxism; nonetheless, these are fueled by the biological impulse to climb to the top of the heirarchy. With the meme’s insatiable hunger to enlarge itself, we have a precise prescription for war. Biology is not destiny; but human culture is not always the buffer to our most primitive instincts we would like to think it is. In these complex threads of thought lies the Lucifer Principle, and only through understanding its mandates will we able to avoid the nuclear crusades that await us in the twenty-first century.
Seeing Redd
Author: Frank Beddor
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1101200685
Pages: 408
Year: 2007-08-21
View: 869
Read: 814
Wonderland finally seems as if it’s getting back to normal. Queen Alyss is back on the throne, and reunited with her childhood sweetheart, Dodge. But the fight for Wonderland is far from over. King Arch, in nearby Boarderland, is conniving to overthrow everything for which Alyss and her friends have fought so hard. Even worse, King Arch has found an ally in the recently returned Redd, who has been biding her time and gathering new and evil assassins in the Catacombs of Paris. With enemies circling and danger looming, someone close to Alyss lets her down—and threatens the future of Wonderland forever.
Against the Day
Author: Thomas Pynchon
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1101594667
Pages: 1584
Year: 2012-06-13
View: 1169
Read: 269
A New York Times Notable Book of the Year, a Washington Post Best Book of the Year Spanning the era between the Chicago World’s Fair of 1893 and the years just after World War I, and constantly moving between locations across the globe (and to a few places not strictly speaking on the map at all), Against the Day unfolds with a phantasmagoria of characters that includes anarchists, balloonists, gamblers, drug enthusiasts, mathematicians, mad scientists, shamans, spies, and hired guns. As an era of uncertainty comes crashing down around their ears and an unpredictable future commences, these folks are mostly just trying to pursue their lives. Sometimes they manage to catch up; sometimes it’s their lives that pursue them.
Republic.com
Author: Cass R. Sunstein
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 0691095892
Pages: 236
Year: 2002
View: 760
Read: 1106
See only what you want to see, hear only what you want to hear, read only what you want to read. In cyberspace, we already have the ability to filter out everything but what we wish to see, hear, and read. Tomorrow, our power to filter promises to increase exponentially. With the advent of the Daily Me, you see only the sports highlights that concern your teams, read about only the issues that interest you, encounter in the op-ed pages only the opinions with which you agree. In all of the applause for this remarkable ascendance of personalized information, Cass Sunstein asks the questions, Is it good for democracy? Is it healthy for the republic? What does this mean for freedom of speech? Republic.com exposes the drawbacks of egocentric Internet use, while showing us how to approach the Internet as responsible citizens, not just concerned consumers. Democracy, Sunstein maintains, depends on shared experiences and requires citizens to be exposed to topics and ideas that they would not have chosen in advance. Newspapers and broadcasters helped create a shared culture, but as their role diminishes and the customization of our communications universe increases, society is in danger of fragmenting, shared communities in danger of dissolving. In their place will arise only louder and ever more extreme echoes of our own voices, our own opinions. In evaluating the consequences of new communications technologies for democracy and free speech, Sunstein argues the question is not whether to regulate the Net (it's already regulated), but how; proves that freedom of speech is not an absolute; and underscores the enormous potential of the Internet to promote freedom as well as its potential to promote "cybercascades" of like-minded opinions that foster and enflame hate groups. The book ends by suggesting a range of potential reforms to correct current misconceptions and to improve deliberative democracy and the health of the American republic. Chat with Cass Sunstein in a Message Forum hosted beginning April 1, 2001.
The Importance of Being Lazy
Author: Al Gini
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 0415978696
Pages: 182
Year: 2006
View: 1201
Read: 637
Drawing upon in-depth case studies of vacation habits and the observations of philosophers, writers, and sociologists such as Aristotle, Mark Twain and Thorstein Veblen, Al Gini argues why vacations are so venerated and why 'doing nothing' is a fundamental human necessity. From shopping sprees and extreme sports to the ultimate vacation - retirement - The Importance of Being lazy demonstrates that without true leisure, we are diminished as individuals and as a society.