The Oresteia Agamemnon The Libation Bearers The Eumenides.php Book PDF, EPUB Download & Read Online Free

The Oresteia
Author: Aeschylus
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 110104263X
Pages: 336
Year: 1984-02-07
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One of the founding documents of Western culture and the only surviving ancient Greek trilogy, the Oresteia of Aeschylus is one of the great tragedies of all time. The three plays of the Oresteia portray the bloody events that follow the victorious return of King Agamemnon from the Trojan War, at the start of which he had sacrificed his daughter Iphigeneia to secure divine favor. After Iphi-geneia’s mother, Clytemnestra, kills her husband in revenge, she in turn is murdered by their son Orestes with his sister Electra’s encouragement. Orestes is pursued by the Furies and put on trial, his fate decided by the goddess Athena. Far more than the story of murder and ven-geance in the royal house of Atreus, the Oresteia serves as a dramatic parable of the evolution of justice and civilization that is still powerful after 2,500 years. The trilogy is presented here in George Thomson’s classic translation, renowned for its fidelity to the rhythms and richness of the original Greek. (Book Jacket Status: Jacketed)
The Oresteia
Author: Aeschylus,
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 1474274323
Pages: 112
Year: 2015-11-07
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He who learns must suffer. Before setting out for the Trojan War, King Agamemnon sacrificed his daughter Iphigenia. Many years later, when Agamemnon returns to his palace, his adulterous Queen Clytemnestra takes her revenge by brutally murdering him and installing her lover on the throne. How will the gods judge Orestes, their estranged son, who must avenge his father's death by murdering his mother? The curse of the House of Atreus, passing from generation to generation, is one of the great myths of Western literature. In the hands of Aeschylus, the story enacts the final victory of reason and justice over superstition and barbarity. The original trilogy, comprising Agamemnon, The Libation Bearers and Eumenides, is distilled into one thrilling three-act play in this magnificent new translation by award-winning playwright Rory Mullarkey.
The House of Atreus
Author: Aeschylus
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1627930310
Pages: 106
Year: 2013-04-08
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Aeschylus was a Greek playwright considered to be the founder of the tragedy. Aeschylus along with Sophocles and Euripides are the three major Greek tragedians whose plays have survived. Before Aeschylus, characters in a play only interacted with the chorus. Aeschylus expanded the number of actors allowing for interaction among the characters. Seven of his 92 plays have survived. The Persian invasion of Greece, which took place during his lifetime, influenced many of his plays. The Oresteia is a trilogy of Greek tragedies written by Aeschylus, which concerns the end of the curse on the House of Atreus. The plays were "Agamemnon," "Choephorae" (The Libation-Bearers), and the "Eumenides" (Furies).
The Seven Against Thebes
Author: Aeschylus
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages: 255
Year: 1908
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Prometheus Bound and Other Plays
Author: Aeschylus, Philip Vellacott
Publisher: Penguin UK
ISBN: 0140441123
Pages: 159
Year: 1961
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Aeschylus (525;456 BC) brought a new grandeur and epic sweep to the drama of classical Athens, raising it to the status of high art. In Prometheus Bound the defiant Titan Prometheus is brutally punished by Zeus for daring to improve the state of wretchedness and servitude in which mankind is kept. The Suppliants tells the story of the fifty daughters of Danaus who must flee to escape enforced marriages, while Seven Against Thebes shows the inexorable downfall of the last members of the cursed family of Oedipus. And The Persians, the only Greek tragedy to deal with events from recent Athenian history, depicts the aftermath of the defeat of Persia in the battle of Salamis, with a sympathetic portrayal of its disgraced King Xerxes. Philip Vellacott's evocative translation is accompanied by an introduction, with individual discussions of the plays, and their sources in history and mythology.
Odysseus at Troy
Author: Sophocles, Euripides
Publisher: Hackett Publishing
ISBN: 1585106518
Pages: 304
Year: 2015-01-02
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This book contains translations of three plays:Ajax, Hecuba, and Trojan Women. They are all centered around the mythological theme of the Greek warrior, Odysseus, hero of the Trojan War. All three plays are complete, with notes and introductions, plus an introduction to the volume with background to the story which was one of the most popular themes and one of the most written about Greek hero in Greek literature. Written during a tumultuous age of sophists and demagogues, these three plays (c. 450-425 BCE) bear witness to the gradual degradation of Odysseus’ character. In presenting the unexpected devolution of a renowned mythic figure, the plays examine numerous themes relevant to contemporary American political life: the profound psychological consequences of brought on by the stress of war and why a once proud and noble warrior might commit suicide; and the dehumanizing darkness that descends upon innocent female war-victims when victors use act on false political necessity.
Orestes and Other Plays
Author: Euripides
Publisher: Penguin UK
ISBN: 0141961988
Pages: 448
Year: 2006-02-23
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Written during the long battles with Sparta that were to ultimately destroy ancient Athens, these six plays by Euripides brilliantly utilize traditional legends to illustrate the futility of war. The Children of Heracles holds a mirror up to contemporary Athens, while Andromache considers the position of women in Greek wartime society. In The Suppliant Women, the difference between just and unjust battle is explored, while Phoenician Women describes the brutal rivalry of the sons of King Oedipus, and the compelling Orestes depicts guilt caused by vengeful murder. Finally, Iphigenia in Aulis, Euripides' last play, contemplates religious sacrifice and the insanity of war. Together, the plays offer a moral and political statement that is at once unique to the ancient world, and prophetically relevant to our own.
The Ancient Greek Hero in 24 Hours
Author: Gregory Nagy
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674075420
Pages: 750
Year: 2013-02-25
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The ancient Greeks’ concept of “the hero” was very different from what we understand by the term today. In 24 installments, based on the Harvard course Gregory Nagy has taught and refined since the 1970s, The Ancient Greek Hero in 24 Hours explores civilization’s roots in Classical literature, a lineage that continues to challenge and inspire us.
The Poetics of Aristotle
Author: Aristotle
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages: 316
Year: 1911
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Ευριπίδου Βάκχαι
Author: Euripides
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages: 93
Year: 1871
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Euripides and His Age
Author: Gilbert Murray
Publisher: Library of Alexandria
ISBN: 1465579044
Pages: 256
Year: 1923
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Ancient Greek Love Magic
Author: Christopher A. FARAONE, Christopher A Faraone
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674036700
Pages: 240
Year: 2009-06-30
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The ancient Greeks commonly resorted to magic spells to attract and keep lovers--as numerous allusions in Greek literature and recently discovered voodoo dolls, magical papyri, gemstones, and curse tablets attest. Surveying and analyzing these various texts and artifacts, Christopher Faraone reveals that gender is the crucial factor in understanding love spells. There are, he argues, two distinct types of love magic: the curselike charms used primarily by men to torture unwilling women with fiery and maddening passion until they surrender sexually; and the binding spells and debilitating potions generally used by women to sedate angry or philandering husbands and make them more affectionate. Faraone's lucid analysis of these spells also yields a number of insights about the construction of gender in antiquity, for example, the femininity of socially inferior males and the maleness of autonomous prostitutes. Most significantly, his findings challenge the widespread modern view that all Greek men considered women to be naturally lascivious. Faraone reveals the existence of an alternate male understanding of the female as naturally moderate and chaste, who uses love magic to pacify and control the naturally angry and passionate male. This fascinating study of magical practices and their implications for perceptions of male and female sexuality offers an unusual look at ancient Greek religion and society.
The Choephori
Author: Aeschylus
Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
ISBN: 1534673539
Pages: 46
Year: 2016-06-13
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The Choephori - The Libation Bearers - Aeschylus The Libation Bearers is the second play of the Oresteia. It deals with the reunion of Agamemnon's children, Electra and Orestes, and their revenge. Orestes kills Clytemnestra to avenge the death of Agamemnon, Orestes' father. Storyline Orestes arrives at the grave of his father, accompanied by his cousin Pylades, the son of the king of Phocis, where he has grown up in exile; he places two locks of his hair on the tomb. Orestes and Pylades hide as Electra, Orestes' sister, arrives at the grave accompanied by a chorus of elderly slave women (the libation bearers of the title) to pour libations on Agamemnon's grave; they have been sent by Clytemnestra in an effort "to ward off harm" (l.42). Just as the ritual ends, Electra spots a lock of hair on the tomb which she recognizes as similar to her own; subsequently she sees two sets of footprints, one of which has proportions similar to hers. At this point Orestes and Pylades emerge from their hiding place and Orestes gradually convinces her of his identity. Now, in the longest and most structurally complex lyric passage in extant Greek tragedy, the chorus, Orestes, and Electra, attempt to conjure the departed spirit of Agamemnon to aid them in revenging his murder. Orestes then asks "why she sent libations, what calculation led her to offer too late atonement for a hurt past cure" (l.515-516). The chorus responds that in the palace of Argos Clytemnestra was roused from slumber by a nightmare: she dreamt that she gave birth to a snake, and the snake now feeds from her breast and draws blood along with milk. Alarmed by this, a possible sign of the gods' wrath, she "sent these funeral libations" (l.538). Orestes believes that he is the snake in his mother's dream, so together with Electra they plan to avenge their father by killing their mother Clytemnestra and her new husband, Aegisthus.
Magika Hiera
Author: Christopher A. Faraone, Dirk Obbink
Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand
ISBN: 0195111400
Pages: 298
Year: 1997
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This collection challenges the tendency among scholars of ancient Greece to see magical and religious ritual as mutually exclusive and to ignore "magical" practices in Greek religion. The contributors survey specific bodies of archaeological, epigraphical, and papyrological evidence for magical practices in the Greek world, and, in each case, determine whether the traditional dichotomy between magic and religion helps in any way to conceptualize the objective features of the evidence examined. Contributors include Christopher A. Faraone, J.H.M. Strubbe, H.S. Versnel, Roy Kotansky, John Scarborough, Samuel Eitrem, Fritz Graf, John J. Winkler, Hans Dieter Betz, and C.R. Phillips.
Greek Alphabet
Author: Catherine R. Proppe
Publisher: Catherine Proppe
ISBN: 1940274486
Pages: 165
Year: 2013-08-01
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What do the letters of the ancient Greek alphabet mean? Conventionally, the answer is that they are simply sounds without meaning. But the thing is, the ancient Greeks saw meaning in everything. They equated the natural world with the divine. They studied the world to understand divinity. In doing so, the ancient Greeks created the foundation of modern math, science, democracy, medicine, art, architecture, and language. In a culture that saw meaning in everything, is it likely that their written record consisted of sounds without meaning? Not very. Greek letters have meaning. Greek Alphabet: Unlock the Secrets explains why Greek letters are shaped the way they are, what they mean, and how these letters are used to form meaningful words. Spoiler alert: Omega is most definitely not the last letter of the Greek alphabet.